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Behind the Headlines: APA News Blog

Academic Version: Applying my personal experiences and academic research as a professor of Sociology and Asian American Studies to provide a more complete understanding of political, economic, and cultural issues and current events related to American race relations, and Asia/Asian America in particular.

Plain English: Trying to put my Ph.D. to good use.

April 11, 2013

Written by C.N.

Links, Jobs, & Announcements #73

Here are some more announcements, links, and job postings about academic-related jobs, fellowships, and other opportunities for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues, with a particular focus on Asian Americans. As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Position: Ethnic Studies, Univ. of Colorado

© Corbis

The Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder invites applications for a full-time instructorship in Comparative Ethnic Studies with an emphasis in critical sports studies. Applicants must be able to teach classes on sports and their social contexts of race, gender, sexuality, and/or globalization, as well as a comparative Foundations of Ethnic Studies course and other courses in their specialties.

A Ph.D. is preferred, though ABD candidates will be considered. The teaching load is 4-3, plus additional service to the department such as working with student groups. This is a non-continuing position with a two-year contract beginning in Fall 2013. To apply, please send a letter of application discussing teaching interests and experience, c.v., and evidence of teaching excellence to: ethnicst@colorado.edu. Review of applications will begin on April 8 and continue until the position is filled.

Post-Doc: Immigration, USC

The Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (CSII) combines data analysis, academic scholarship, and civic engagement to support improved economic mobility for, enhanced civic participation by, and receiving society openness to immigrants.

Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowship, 2013-2015

The USC Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (CSII) and the USC Department of Sociology announce a two-year post-doctoral Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship, beginning Fall 2013. The fellowship focuses on immigrant populations and the potential impact and/or need for Comprehensive Immigration reform (CIR) for the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 academic years.

While we would prefer a post-doctoral teaching fellow looking at the populations likely to benefit from CIR in order to help us build a research project looking at the longitudinal effects, we would also be open to candidates who would study the politics of change. We would prefer an interdisciplinary researcher who could utilize and teach mixed methods approaches (i.e., both quantitative and qualitative) to Sociology graduates and undergraduates in his/her teaching role. The fellow will teach one course each semester at USC and is expected to conduct research with CSII. The fellowship will offer a competitive salary, a yearly $2,000 research allowance, and fringe benefits. The fellow must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. by mid-August, 2013.

Review of applications will commence on May 03, 2013, with a decision expected approximately May 17, 2013. Please follow the application process and upload the following materials:

  1. C.V.
  2. Detailed description of the nature of the research to be undertaken during the fellowship period
  3. Relevant writing sample of no more than 30 pages
  4. Contact information for three references (they will be asked to directly submit on your behalf)

To apply:

  • Visit the USC website
  • Click “Search postings” on the left
  • Search by Requisition ID 018495

Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration
950 W. Jefferson Blvd., JEF 102 | Los Angeles, CA 90089-1291
P: 213.740.3643 | F: 213.740.5680 | E: csii@usc.edu

Lecture Series: Mentoring Faculty of Color, CUNY

Mentoring of Future Faculty of Color Project Lecture Series

Developed in conversation with many students in the GC English PhD program, this initiative aims to offer scholarly and professional mentorship to students of color in CUNY PhD Programs by bringing in faculty of color from a variety of U.S. universities to share both their scholarship and their experiences in navigating the academy. We are delighted to announce that four fantastic scholars will be visiting us each consecutive Friday, starting April 19th. Each of these scholars will provide a talk on their current research. Please find the description, dates/times and venues for each of the four talks below. All events taking place at the CUNY Graduate Center (365 Fifth Ave NYC).

“Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, and Empire: British Literature in the Eighteenth-century”
Suvir Kaul (English at UPenn)
Fri 4/19 @ 2PM – Room 4406, English Lounge

This paper will explore the idea that “Cosmopolitanism,” as a term, an idealized state of being, and a cultural and political idea, comes into vogue in historical circumstances where the putative attributes of cosmopolitanism—tolerance of, even ease with, people of different nationalities, cultures, religions, and races—are disabled in practice. Eighteenth-century English and European commentators on cultural difference derived most of their operative sociological and historical categories from the explosion of information produced by commercial and colonial expansion across the globe.

Out of this welter of knowledge emerged the theories of kinship and social development that underpinned imperialist ideas of human difference as well as more cosmopolitan arguments that insisted on the recuperative powers of cultural knowledge and human sympathy. Such cosmopolitanism was a forceful, though necessarily compromised, response to the cultural coercions of empire. I will show that eighteenth-century literary texts are a fruitful archive for discussions of the forms and vocabularies of cosmopolitanism, and also venture a larger, more speculative claim: cosmopolitanism, that is, the awareness of the mediated relations between provinces and nations, nations and colonies, and between competitive empires in history and in the contemporary moment, enabled “English Literature” to come into institutional being in the eighteenth century.

“‘One of these mornings, you’re gonna rise up singing': Black Women (Un)Doing Gershwinian Time”
Daphne Brooks (English at Princeton)
Fri 4/26 @ 2PM – Room 4406, English Loung
e

This talk considers the ways in which a range of black women musicians–from jazz musicians and opera legends to pop divas and avant-garde experimentalists–have traversed the music of the Gershwins’ folk opera Porgy and Bess, and it explores the ways that these artists have transformed this unlikely musical vehicle into black feminist temporal insurgencies.

“Carceral Aesthetics: Art and Visuality in the Era of Mass Incarceration”
Nicole Fleetwood, (American Studies at Rutgers)
Fri 5/3 @ 2PM – Room 4406, English Lounge

Popular entertainment, journalistic exposes, and documentary sobriety produce countless images of “life behind bars.” These images fascinate, horrify and titillate; and yet prison is a site that the majority of the public will never enter as inmate, guest, worker, or researcher. It is a site that we know almost exclusively through the lens of others; and yet we know it so well. As Angela Davis argues, prison is such a foundational feature of our contemporary environment and polity that it has taken on a quality of familiarity and common sense. The popularity of visual representations of prison life underscores the significance of visuality in establishing and maintaining the modern carceral system—particularly in the United States. And yet, the visual world of prison has received little sustained analysis in scholarship and public discourse.

In this talk I examine carceral aesthetics to refer to how visual lenses operate and artistic practices emerge in relationship to the modern prison industrial complex. The talk examines late twentieth century documentary studies and artistic projects by incarcerated and non-incarcerated subjects. These works are composed and staged in ways that speak to, work through, or incorporate the ever-looming and multiple lenses of carceral optics. The works of Deborah Luster, Dread Scott, Duron Jackson, and others will be considered.

“Little Monsters: Fabulating a Queer Bestiary”
Tavia Nyong’o (Tavia Nyong’o, Performance Studies at NYU)
Fri 5/10 @ 2PM – President’s conference room, 8201.01

“Wildness” has emerged as a post-ecological motif among critics interested in pushing queer and critical race studies past the impasse of the death-bound subject. But where exactly is this wild to which we imagine a return located? This talk mounts an imaginative itinerary through the haunts and havens of the fabulous beasts and little monsters of today. It speculates that a new entelechy of the queer is increasingly subsuming the epistemology of the closet, with its emphasis of power-knowledge. Queerness is mutating and developing new immunities to disclosure and new vulnerabilities as raw life. Popular music increasingly moves along the grooves of this fugitive queer vitalism.

Please feel free to forward widely and to contact us should you have any further questions: ceng@gc.cuny.edu

Call for Papers: Asians in the Americas, Pepperdine Univ.

Call for Papers: Second Symposium on Asians in the Americas
Pepperdine University
Sponsored by Pepperdine University and the International Studies and Languages Division

September 27-28, 2013

This symposium aims to explore the multifaceted representations of Asian lives in the Americas in history, sociology, religion, anthropology, art, education, film, and popular culture. In contemporary diaspora, globalization, and transnational studies we are reminded of the movement of Asians to the Americas as a people and through representations. We emphasize that although Asians have been in the Americas since at least the 16th Century, the movement of Asians outside of Asia is, ostensibly, a footnote in many fields. Similarly, current scholarship of Asians in the Americas focuses on East Asians in the Americas and rarely discusses South Asians, Southeast Asians, Central Asians, and Western Asians.

The symposium seeks to examine the multiple intersections of borders, race, nationality, geopolitical power, homeland, identity, and the transmission of culture as it specifically relates to the Asians in the Americas. We invite papers that focus on any aspect of the symposium themes and especially encourage interdisciplinary approaches. Topics may focus on a specific diaspora, such as the Japanese diaspora, or tied to the specific host country, for example, the South Asians in Canada, but should be able to serve as a general context to this hemisphere as a whole.

Please send an abstract of no more than 200 words to:

Dr. David Simonowitz (Organizer) by May 15, 2013
David.simonowitz@pepperdine.edu

Co-organizers: Dr. Zelideth Rivas, Marshall University
Dr. Alejandro Lee, Central Washington University

Positions: Poll Workers, Boston

The Boston Election Department is recruiting Poll Workers to assist in the important work of staffing the City’s 254 precincts for all the upcoming Elections.

In order to guide voters through the electoral process smoothly and speedily and to ensure that all the poll-ing locations are adequately staffed, the Election Department requires a full complement of Poll Workers. There is also a critical need for bilingual individuals to serve in all the Poll Worker roles: Wardens, Clerks, Inspectors and Interpreters. Bilingual speakers of Spanish, Cape Verdean, Vietnamese, Chinese, Haitian Creole, Russian, Portuguese, and Somali are strongly encouraged to apply.

Job responsibilities include, but are not limited, to the following: assist with preparing the voting location for opening; hang signs in accordance with legal requirements; count ballots; check in voters; maintain a record of the Election Day・s activities; check handicap access; assist in removing signage; pack up election materials; and help check counts at the end of the day.

Please note these are one day positions only.

There are stipends ranging from $135-$175 for Poll Workers. While it is encouraged that all Poll Workers be available from 6AM to the closing of the polls (9PM), those workers serving as Inspectors or Interpreters may opt for a half-day shift: 6AM to 2PM or 1PM to 9PM (prorated pay rate of $9/hour). All prospective Poll Workers will be required to attend a mandatory 2-hour training session prior to the Elections.

Poll Workers must be registered voters in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; preference will be given to voters with proven and consistent voter history. All Poll Workers must exhibit a professional and helpful demeanor, and must be respectful and mindful of the ethnic and cultural diversity of Boston・s voters.

For more information on becoming a Poll Worker , please contact the Boston Election Department at (617)635 ・3767 or by email at email at Election@cityofboston.gov. Applications can be downloaded directly from our website and can be mailed, faxed or returned as an email attachment.


March 18, 2011

Written by C.N.

Links, Jobs, & Announcements #40

Here are some more announcements, links, and job postings about academic-related jobs, fellowships, and other related opportunities for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues. As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Job: Vietnamese Interpreters in Orange County, CA

Are you bilingual in Vietnamese and English? Are you looking for positions that pays $17.00 an hour or more? Superior Court of Orange County is now accepting applications from candidates that are Bilingual in Vietnamese and English.

The Court has numerous full-time positions and some part-time positions that serve the public and/or work in a call center environment that utilize bilingual skills. Qualified candidates will earn an additional $0.58 or $1.15 an hour on top of the hourly base pay for meeting our bilingual requirements. Current needs are in Laguna Hills; however, we also have work locations in Westminster, Santa Ana, Newport Beach, Fullerton, Irvine, and Orange.

For more information about the positions and how to apply, visit our website.

Position: English, Hawai’i Pacific University

The Department of English, Hawai’i Pacific University, invites applications for 1 full-time, career-track (in lieu of a tenure system, HPU uses a “career-track” system consisting of 5 years of renewable reappointments (two 1-year and a 3-year contract) culminating in “career” status consisting of a series of 5-year contracts) faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor for a nine-month appointment to begin Fall 2011. We are seeking applicants with a background in film/media studies or world literature. The successful applicant will be expected to teach a combination of 24 credits (typically 8 classes) of courses in first-year composition; general education, literature, film/media studies, and/or cultural studies; and upper-division English courses in the candidate’s area of specialty. Development of upper-level courses related to area of expertise is also expected as is participation in University and community service.

Minimum qualifications: Candidates for the position should have a Ph.D. in English. ABD will be considered if degree can be completed within first year of appointment. Desired qualifications: Evidence of successful teaching in composition and literature, media studies, or culture studies preferred. The successful applicant must also demonstrate a sincere interest and ability in undergraduate teaching in a multicultural environment, a promising record of scholarship, and an interest in faculty/student extracurricular activities and program review.

To Apply: Applicants should apply online. Supporting documents such as curriculum vitae, three letters of reference, a statement of teaching philosophy, evidence of teaching experience, and description of professional development goals may be submitted electronically as Word or PDF files put together in a ZIP file named with the last name and position number (ex: Jones ####) and e-mailed to HR@hpu.edu. Paper submissions of supporting documents are also accepted at Human Resources: Hawai‘i Pacific University HR Department; 1132 Bishop Street, Suite 310; Honolulu, HI 96813. E-mail: hr@hpu.edu. FAX: 808-544-1192. Review of applications may begin on March 15, 2011.

Department Contact address: Dr. Laurie Leach, 808-544-1103.

Position: Field Manager, The Leadership Conference

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights (The Leadership Conference) is the leading coalition of organizations committed to civil and human rights in the United States and The Leadership Conference Education Fund is the major research and education organization supporting the coalition. We are seeking applicants for the position of field manager with a background in social media organizing, among other qualifications. It’s a great opportunity to work on multiple civil and human rights issues with a diverse range of groups and communities, nationally and at the state and local level.

Description
The Field Manager will be responsible for a variety of tasks within the Department of Field Operations (DFO). The employee in this position will report to the Vice President, Field Operations, with guidance from the Deputy Field Director(s).

Skills and Qualifications
The job requires a commitment to civil and human rights; organizing and outreach experience; a demonstrated ability to manage multiple tasks; planning and coordinating skills; excellent interpersonal skills; and the ability to work in a fast-paced environment and adhere to deadlines. Minimum requirements are a Bachelors degree; a minimum of three years of field/grassroots experience, preferably with a focus on the creation of materials and tools designed for community leaders and grassroots campaigns; and a demonstrated understanding of and proficiency in the use of social media and web activism software, and Microsoft applications.

Excellent writing and verbal skills, particularly as related to drafting and creating field materials and tools; desire and ability to work with diverse groups of people; desire and ability to manage a complex, ever-changing workload; ability to organize time efficiently; ability to work with intra-departmental teams, interns, and community leaders; and a high level of personal energy and commitment to civil and human rights are essential. Hill experience not required, however a plus.

This is a mid-level position at the center of the organizations’ major work. The employee will have the opportunity to work with the DFO to participate in and/or lead field campaigns to activate the grassroots on critical civil and human rights issues. The employee will play a key role in developing and advancing grassroots strategy on the major priority issues of The Leadership Conference. S/he will also be exposed to the most broad-based civil and human rights coalition in the country, and to participatory democracy at its best.

Duties and Responsibilities
Work directly with the Vice President for Field Operations and field team to:

  • Envision and draft materials, alerts and tools for grassroots activists, community leaders, and the civil and human rights coalition as the DFO develops field campaigns on priority Leadership Conference issues
  • Work with the field team to devise a strategy around components of online activism, such as Internet action alerts, social networking systems and innovative web-based outreach
  • Serve as DFO representative on the intra-departmental Online Strategy Group
  • Devise grassroots outreach and activation strategies on organizational priority issues, with a particularized focus on developing written materials and social media tools for national, state, and local partners’ use
  • Plan, manage and maintain effective technical support for members of the coalition in their efforts to activate the grassroots and for state and local partner organizations as they implement grassroots campaigns
  • Drive and monitor the development of field outreach, public education, and capacity campaigns in a set of key states as they relate to the organizations’ priority issues and areas of focus
  • Work with the DFO to develop grassroots coalitions in key states and to organize national grassroots task force meetings
  • Participate in department, All-Staff, team, and other meetings as needed

Salary and Benefits
This is a mid-level position with a starting salary in the mid forties.

To Apply
Send resume and cover letter, by March 31, 2011, via email to personnel@civilrights.org with Field Manager in the subject line; fax to (202) 466-3435, or mail to:

The Leadership Conference /The Leadership Conference Education Fund
1629 K Street, N.W., 10th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20006
Attention: Field Manager Search

No telephone inquiries, please.

Reality Show Call for Participants: Asian American Families

We have been commissioned by the BBC to make a programme on family values and parenting in different nations and cultures all over the world. We are now in the 4th series of this very popular programme but have yet to represent a family of Asian origin – and would very much like to do so in the States in the coming weeks.

We are reaching out to families ( with teens) and are hoping that a loving, but disciplined family will be interested in participating in the series whereby they ‘host’ 2 British teenagers for a week, instilling in them the values and morality they demand of their own children. This very popular programme has already met and filmed inspirational families in countries ranging from South Africa to India, US to Lebanon.

If you know of any families who are interested in participating, you can contact me at my email below.

Kind regards,
Rebecca
rebeccasymons@twentytwenty.tv

Online Survey: Asian American Values

I am a doctoral candidate from the Department of Counseling and Human Development Services at the University of Georgia under the direction of Dr. Brian Glaser. I invite you to participate in a research study entitled “A Study of Scale Construction in the Asian American/Pacific Islander Population”. The purpose of this study is to investigate the values system within the Asian American/ Pacific Islanders (AAPI) population in order to create a scale that accurately quantifies these values.

You are invited to participate in a study investigating value systems in the Asian-American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) population. Any self-identified AAPI or with AAPI heritage, ages 18 and over, are welcome to participate. If you agree to participate, you will be asked to answer a series of question reflecting your values system as part of a larger study to create a measurement scale. Your answers will remain anonymous.

The scale consists of 46 items and will take approximately 5-20 minutes to complete. By taking part in this study, your responses may help improve the conceptualization and treatment of AAPI clients in therapy. If you have any questions or concerns, please refer to the informational letter for further contact information. Your help is greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Pearl S. Chang, M.Ed., M.A.
University of Georgia
pearl1@uga.edu

Research Supervisor:
Brian Glaser, Ph.D.
bglaser@uga.edu

Adjunct Positions in Asian American Studies: Hunter College

The Asian American Studies Program at Hunter College (AASP), The City University of New York, currently seeks candidates to develop and teach Asian American Studies courses primarily in the Social Sciences, e.g. Psychology, Political Science, History, Sociology, Human Rights, Economics, etc. In addition, we also seek candidates to develop and teach Asian American Studies courses in Education, Journalism/Media Studies/Communication, and Public Health. Applicants must have at least an M.A. or ABD in a relevant field, as well as a record of successful undergraduate teaching.

About the Program
The Asian American Studies Program (AASP) at Hunter College was founded in 1993 on the initiative of students and faculty. Today, we are a small but dynamic program with a growing number of minors, and we offer approximately 12 courses per semester, ranging from our interdisciplinary survey courses to more advanced courses in Literature, Cultural Studies, and Diasporic community formations — West Asian American, Chinese American, and Korean American in particular. Located in the heart of New York City, the AASP works closely with Asian American organizations to build and sustain ties to local communities and concerns. Affiliated full-time faculty in the College are located in areas as diverse as Urban Studies, Film and Media, Sociology, English, and Dance.

Teaching at Hunter
Applicants should be prepared to teach their classe(es) to a cross-section of undergraduate students from all majors. The majority of our courses are taught by adjunct faculty: as a result the work you will do in our program is crucial to the process of introducing undergraduates to concepts concerning Asian American history and experience. We hope to work with dedicated, effective, and intelligent educators, and we seek to provide a welcoming and supportive work environment for our faculty.

Please email the following documents to: jennifer.hayashida@hunter.cuny.edu

  1. CV
  2. Letter of Intent
  3. Brief Pedagogical Statement outlining your teaching philosophy
  4. Contact information for at least 3 references

Jennifer Hayashida, Acting Director
Asian American Studies Program
Hunter College, CUNY
695 Park Avenue, Room 1037HE
New York, NY 10065

Call for Suggestions: Asian American Women Stories

Hello! I am the publisher of MySavvySisters.com a website dedicated to empowering women. I want all races to be represented on our website and I would love for you to pass along the names of any outstanding women that you know of who are enjoying their lives or careers. I would love to profile them and introduce them to our readers.

Please feel free to check out our site with tips on women I can profile.

Thanks!
Te-Erika Patterson


March 1, 2011

Written by C.N.

Links, Jobs, & Announcements #38

Here are some more announcements, links, and job postings about academic-related jobs, fellowships, and other related opportunities for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues. As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Queer Southeast Asian Census

Today is the last day to help take the Queer Southeast Asian (QSEA) Census, March 1, 2011. As of now, we have collected 380 surveys nationally by Hmong, Thai, Laotian, Vietnamese and Cambodians who are LGBTQ living in the US. We need 20 more surveys to be taken to reach our goal of 400 and it would be fantastic if we surpass that goal!

I wanted to reach out to you all again in hopes that if you haven’t taken the survey yet, to please do so, as this is historical and ground breaking data that we have been needing to
help support our work and bring visibility to our communities that do exist for over 30 years in the US. And for those that have taken it or don’t fit the criteria, please help us outreach it to your family, friends and network until midnight via Facebook, social networks, website and email.

Our QSEA Census is directed towards Queer Southeast Asians that have been affected by the Vietnam War living in the countries of Laos, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia.

(Paid) Internship: Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics

Leadership in Action (LIA) is an eight-week paid summer internship program designed to develop emerging young leaders by providing college students with practical leadership skills and the opportunity to work hands-on in the Asian and Pacific Islander (API) community in Southern California.

Approaching its 14th year, the program takes learning beyond the classroom, and places the student interns in a range of API community based organizations in order to gain real-life experience working at nonprofits. The intern will be paid $2,000 for the eight-week internship.

The intern’s weekly schedule is comprised of 4 days at their assigned community based organization (CBO) and 1 day at LEAP. At the CBO, the intern works with their assigned supervisor on a meaningful project. At LEAP, the intern’s day is devoted to leadership development training, issue discussions, CBO site visits and a community impact project. Nationally recognized trainers deliver workshops in critical skill areas. Issue discussions are on local or timely topics of interest and are facilitated by local community leaders/activists and LEAP trainers.

The community impact project will give the students interns an opportunity to flex their leadership skills in a safe setting, as well as allow them to contribute a service that has lasting impact on to the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. The 2011 program will be held in Los Angeles from June 20 – August 12, 2011.

The application process for interns is now open. Applications are due Friday, March 11th, 2011. There are two rounds in the application process. The first round is where a committee reviews all the applications and decides who they want to come in for an interview. The second round is the actual interview either at LEAP or by teleconference. The results will be decided by the end of March and interns will be notified by the first week of April.

Junior Faculty Development Workshop, Penn State

On June 2-4, 2011, the East of California Caucus and the Pennsylvania State University will sponsor a junior faculty development workshop for early-career Asian Americanists. The workshop reflects EOC’s historical commitment to mentoring junior faculty and providing support to those working to increase the disciplinary and curricular visibility of Asian American Studies in higher education. Specifically, the workshop will help professionalize junior faculty by focusing on how to:

  • Create extra-institutional networks of support
  • Identify meaningful research projects and develop vocabularies for how to talk about such projects with a variety of audiences (department chairs, audiences outside of Asian American Studies, potential editors)
  • Confront pedagogical challenges
  • Establish effective collegial relationships
  • Navigate the tenure process successfully

To accomplish these goals, the workshop will feature panel discussions, breakout sessions, and work-in-progress workshops. Please note that space will be limited to ensure a high level of interaction among all participants. Interested scholars should submit a brief letter of application outlining what the applicant hopes to gain by attending the workshop, a draft or excerpt of approximately 7-15 pages of the article or book chapter being proposed for workshop development (only work that has not yet been published is eligible), and a c.v. Please send materials to Tina Chen tina.chen@psu.edu and Eric Hung msumeric@gmail.com; questions should be directed to Tina Chen.

This event is funded by the Penn State Asian Studies Program (ASP) with additional support from the Center for American Literary Studies (CALS). The workshop will begin on Thursday evening (6/2) and conclude at 12:30 on Saturday (6/4). PSU will cover lodging and all meals during the event (specifically, 2 nights of lodging; dinner on Thursday; all meals on Friday; and breakfast and lunch on Saturday).

Application Deadline: March 25, 2011.

Conference: Asian American Activism

Out of the Margins: Asian American Movement Building. A two-day conference on the past, present, and future of activism and social change. March 25-26, 2011 at the University of Michigan.

Highlights:

  • Conversation between Grace Lee Boggs and Michael Hardt on the Next American Revolution (3/25, 4pm, Michigan League Ballroom)
  • Asian American performers showcase with Geologic (from Blue Scholars), Kiwi and DJ Phatrick, comic Hari Kondabolu, and Nobuko Miyamoto (3/25, 7:30pm, Michigan League Ballroom)
  • Panel discussions on immigrant rights, youth organizing, cultural activism, building multiracial coalitions and campus/community connections (3/26, 9am to 6pm, Trotter Multicultural Center)

Join students, scholars, artists, and community organizers from the University of Michigan and across the nation in this historic event. See our website for updated information and free registration.

Sponsored by:

  • University of Michigan Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies Program
  • Committee on Institutional Cooperation
  • Asian American Association
  • Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives
  • Rackham Graduate School
  • United Asian American Organizations
  • Asian American Studies Program (Ohio State University)
  • Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs, Asian/Pacific Islander American Heritage Month
  • Michigan Community Scholars Program

(Unpaid) Internship: LGBT Refugees

Examining the Resettlement & Integration Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Refugees
Intensive Internship Yielding Thesis-Level Stand-Alone Report and Publication
[10-week Program from June 13th to August 19th]

ORAM (Organization for Refuge, Asylum and Migration) is a California-based non-profit organization with a mission to advocate for refugees fleeing sexual or gender based persecution. ORAM conducts international education and advocacy on behalf of these highly vulnerable individuals. It also provides legal counseling and representation as these persons struggle to find security and safe haven. We work with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), with other non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and with community-based groups in the U.S. and abroad to achieve our mission. More information is available at www.oraminternational.org.

Project: Conducting a Survey on the Resettlement Experiences of LGBTI Refugees
ORAM is looking for exceptionally committed and highly qualified interns to conduct and report upon a survey documenting the experiences of LGBTI refugees in the United States. Each intern will be assigned a geographic area corresponding to his/her location. After contacting local resettlement organizations and locating LGBTI refugees, the intern will conduct in-person interviews with the persons identified. ORAM will provide translation services on an as-needed basis. Basing their work on a survey designed by ORAM, interns will inquire into areas including the refugees’ access to medical and mental health care, ability to find employment, and access to safe housing.

Participants’ stand-alone papers based on these interviews will be appropriate for use as graduation theses, upon school approval. ORAM will utilize the information gathered to compile a high quality analytical advocacy report, along with extensive recommendations for organizations and government agencies resettling LGBTI refugees. As in all ORAM projects, student contributors will be fully credited in the final published work.

Requirements
Anthropology, sociology, gender studies, social work and journalism students are encouraged to apply. Applicants must have excellent interviewing, listening and writing skills. High-level fluency in a second language, including (but not limited to) Spanish, Arabic, French or Farsi is highly desirable. Applicants receiving academic credit for this internship are strongly preferred. Interns are unpaid. They will work a minimum of 20 hours of work per week during a 10-week period in the summer of 2011. Interns will report to an ORAM supervisor and will be required to attend a weekly meeting via Skype.

Application Procedures
Interested applicants should send (1) a resume, (2) a cover letter, and (3) an original, non-fiction writing sample to ORAM Internship Coordinator at internship@oraminternational.org. Please write “Resettlement Experiences Internship Application” in the subject line of the email. Applications will be evaluated on an ongoing basis until May 1, 2011.


January 6, 2009

Written by C.N.

Racial Differences in College Faculty Job Satisfaction

Firstly, thanks for your patience these past few weeks — between the end of the semester, grading, traveling to visit relatives over the holidays, and most recently, switching web hosts, I was not able to post as often as I wanted. But a new year brings a new start!

As many of you already know, since I am a sociology professor and a person of color, issues related to the intersection of those two areas of my life are particularly significant for me. With that in mind, as Inside Higher Education reports, a new report examines levels of job satisfaction among college faculty and finds some interesting differences by racial group:

Compared to white faculty members, African American, Asian and Native American faculty were less satisfied on a series of questions on climate, culture and collegiality at their institutions. Of the 10 climate measures in the survey, Asians were less satisfied on 6; Native Americans on 5; and African Americans on 4, all by statistically significant margins.

These gaps may be particularly important to colleges seeking to diversify their faculties, as a key theme of COACHE reports has been the idea that today’s younger generation of professors — far more than previous generations — will judge colleges as employers on issues of campus culture and supportive employment policies, not just on prestige or compensation.

At the same time, the new data show that the issues are not identical for all minority groups and that colleges that “lump everyone together” may not be reaching the topics crucial to different populations. . .

For black faculty members, for example, job satisfaction levels with regard to work-life balance were similar to those for white faculty members. But they reported lower levels of satisfaction on interactions with tenured and pre-tenure colleagues, with sense of “fit” at their institutions, and with their sense of fair treatment in their departments. African American faculty members are also less likely than their white counterparts to believe that tenure decisions are made primarily on job performance. . . .

Asian faculty members indicated a different set of issues. Compared to their white counterparts, Asian faculty reported greater clarity about tenure expectations and higher levels of satisfaction on many questions about job satisfaction. But when it comes to questions related to teaching, they were less happy on most questions.

The actual report provides more detailed descriptions of the findings by racial group. Since I have a particular interest in the findings regarding Asian American faculty, some of the findings that struck me was as noteworthy are (as stated in the text of the report):

  • Asian faculty responded that expectations for performance as scholars were significantly more reasonable than did white faculty; however, they felt that expectations for performance as campus citizens were significantly less reasonable than did white faculty.
  • Asian faculty reported significantly more satisfaction than did white faculty with how they spend their time, the number of hours they work as a faculty member in an average week, the amount of time they have to conduct research, the quality of the facilities, the amount of access they have to [graduate assistants]. . . . However, they reported significantly less satisfaction than did white faculty with all but one item in the teaching composite (number of students they teach).
  • Asian faculty reported significantly less agreement than white faculty that their institutions do what they can to make raising children and the tenure-track compatible
  • Asian faculty reported significantly less satisfaction than their white colleagues with regard to the fairness with which their immediate supervisors evaluate their work . . . and their sense of ‘fit’ in their departments.

To summarize, the report data shows that, compared to their White counterparts, Asian tenure-track faculty generally felt that expectations for scholarly performance were reasonable, that they were satisfied with how they spent their professional time and the quality of the academic resources available to them.

However, also compared to their White colleagues, Asian tenure-track faculty were more dissatisfied with their teaching demands, the demands of them as “campus citizens,” with the resources available to them to balance work and family responsibilities, with how their immediate supervisors evaluated their work, and their overall “fit” within their departments.

How should we make sense of these results regarding Asian faculty? At first, these results may actually seem contradictory but for those like me who work in academic settings, they do make sense. The results basically show the Asian faculty know what’s expected of them research-wise and are fine with such expectations, but generally don’t like the teaching demands.

But perhaps most troubling is that Asian faculty generally feel that they aren’t fully integrated or aren’t given fair opportunities to integrate into the more informal “collegial” social environment around them. If this is true, what are the reasons behind such frustrations?

To try to answer that question, I refer back to my earlier post about the effects of racial diversity on college students in which the results of a different study showed that, among other things, increased racial/ethnic diversity among student populations resulted in more racial tolerance, with the notable exception of when White and Black students had an Asian roommate.

I pointed out that perhaps there is a qualitative difference between having an Asian immigrant roommate and having an Asian American (U.S.-born or raised) roommate and that such a distinction would account for this particular negative finding. I think the same idea can be applied to these results regarding Asian faculty.

That is, perhaps Asian immigrant faculty have a qualitatively harder time integrating into the “mainstream’ collegial social environment than do U.S.-born or raised Asian American faculty. This difficulty may be due to cultural and language barriers.

Or perhaps more interestingly (and again alluding to what I wrote in my earlier post), perhaps it may also involve an unconscious bias or hostility against Asians as ‘foreigners’ and as Asian faculty being perceived as representatives of the economic and cultural threat posed by the rise of countries such as China and India.

I think there is a lot of circumstantial evidence emerging that suggests that as the world in general and American society in particular become increasingly diverse, racial/ethnic tensions seem to be gradually and unfortunately rising as “mainstream” Americans feel economically and culturally unstable and even threatened.

Nonetheless, that does not mean everything is doom and gloom. With the example of Obama’s election as our next President, I think there are some very strong rays of optimism, tolerance, and cooperation.

Inevitably, there will be an adjustment period for a new sense of “normalcy” to get established, but ultimately, I am hopeful and confident that as a society, we are on the right track and that racial/ethnic disparities, whether they relate to college faculty of color or some other set of issues, will become less of a problem as we move forward.


July 17, 2008

Written by C.N.

Data on Graduate Degrees by Racial Group

Barack Obama’s candidacy for President has, for better and for worse, increasingly prompted us as a society to honestly examine issues of race/ethnicity, discrimination, and racism. In the world of higher education where I work, one issue that continues to vex faculty and administrators is the relative lack of underrepresented minority groups as doctoral recipients and faculty.

With that in mind, Diverse Issues in Higher Education has just released data on the distribution of higher education degrees by type and racial/ethnic group. The article’s tables are a little difficult to quickly interpret, but as the authors note, the news tends to be good for Asian Americans, but not quite so good for Latinos and African Americans:

In prior year Top 100 analyses, we have noted how the representation of African-Americans and Hispanics tends to decline with increasing degree levels. The first two charts of this analysis show that this is still the case with one notable exception.

African-Americans compose roughly 12 percent of the U.S. population and are represented among associate degree recipients at this same level. The level of African-American representation declines to just over 9 percent for bachelor’s degree recipients but increases to over 10 percent among master’s degree recipients. The downward trend is then notable in the first professional (7 percent) and doctoral degrees (6.1 percent).

Hispanics show the consistent downward trend we’ve noted in past years, ranging from just under 12 percent among associate degree recipients to just over 3 percent for doctoral degree recipients. . . .

Asian Americans have a much different pattern of representation. They are found in lowest proportion among associate degree recipients (5 percent), in slightly higher proportion among master’s and doctoral degree recipients (6 percent and 5.7 percent, respectively), higher still among bachelor’s degree recipients (7 percent), and then significantly higher among first professional degree recipients (13 percent).

There’s much more data to digest in the full report, but the gist of the results show that we need to pay close attention to the unique and specific needs and issues of each racial/ethnic group if we are to make the institution of higher education more equitable and just for Americans of all backgrounds.

Specifically, African Americans and Latinos are still disproportionately underrepresented as bachelor’s, master’s, professional, and doctorate degree recipients. And while Asian Americans are overrepresented in these categories, the data also shows that most of these recipients are international Asian students, as opposed to U.S.-born or raised Asian Americans.

As we move forward into the 21st century and as American society becomes increasingly globalized and integrated into the international community, one of our most important social institutions — higher education — needs to do a better job at reflecting these face of our nation and world.