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Behind the Headlines: APA News Blog

Academic Version: Applying my personal experiences and academic research as a professor of Sociology and Asian American Studies to provide a more complete understanding of political, economic, and cultural issues and current events related to American race relations, and Asia/Asian America in particular.

Plain English: Trying to put my Ph.D. to good use.

August 31, 2011

Written by C.N.

Links, Jobs, & Announcements #49

Here are some more announcements, links, and job postings about academic-related jobs, fellowships, and other related opportunities for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues. As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Position: Sociology, Urban Inequality, Univ. of Cincinnati

University of Cincinnati. The Department of Sociology invites applicants for three tenure-track positions in urban inequality to begin September 1, 2011. Two positions will be at the Assistant Professor level and one at the Associate Professor level. Assistant Professor candidates should have the potential for becoming leading scholars and generating external research funding. A PhD in Sociology by July 30, 2012 is required. Associate Professor candidates should have substantial scholarly reputations and a record of garnering external funding. For all positions,
excellence in teaching is expected.

Along with current faculty, these positions will comprise a cluster of faculty with interests in urban inequality. Hence, preference will be given
to candidates with a primary scholarly focus in urban inequality. Secondary scholarly interests in family, gender, health/medicine, immigration, race/ethnicity, social movements, or work are desirable. The Department of Sociology is interested in increasing racial and ethnic diversity, so candidates of color are especially encouraged.

Position: Sociology (Race/Ethnicity) U.C. San Diego

The Department of Sociology within the Division of Social Sciences at the University of California, San Diego is committed to academic excellence and diversity within the faculty, staff, and student body. In that commitment, we seek candidates for a faculty position in the Sociology of Race and Ethnicity whose research, teaching, or service has prepared them to contribute to our commitment to diversity and inclusion in higher education. We are open to a wide variety of theoretical and methodological approaches. Preference will be given to scholars at the Assistant Professor level, but excellent candidates in other areas or at other levels will also be seriously considered.

Applicants are asked to submit a CV and samples of their written work, and should ask three referees to send letters of reference. Because a primary consideration for this position will be strong demonstrated accomplishments and a desire to play a leadership role contributing to diversity, equity, and inclusion, applicants are asked to summarize in a personal statement their past experiences and leadership in equity and diversity, or their plans to make contributions in the field. For applicants interested in spousal/partner employment, please visit the UCSD Partner Opportunities Program website.

Application deadline is September 30, 2011.

Applicants should submit all application materials electronically via UCSD’s Academic Personnel On-Line RECRUIT (Preferred method). Please select the following recruitment: SOCIOLOGY Assistant Professor (10-175) JPF00021. If you wish to send hard copies of original publications, please mail to: John Evans, Chair, Department of Sociology-MC 0533, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0533.

Position: Sociology, Immigration, U.C. Merced

The University of California is creating a dynamic new university campus and campus community in Merced, California, which opened in September 2005 as the tenth campus of the University of California and the first American research university built in the 21st century. In keeping with the mission of the University to provide teaching, research and public service of the highest quality, UC Merced will be providing new educational opportunities at the undergraduate, masters and doctoral levels through three academic schools: Engineering, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences/Humanities/Arts.

The School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts invites applications from exceptional scholars for one position at either the Full/Associate or Assistant Professor level in Sociology. Preference will be given to scholars who specialize in the study of Race and Ethnicity, with a substantive focus on immigration and immigrant experiences, economic inequality, labor markets, health and well-being, or education. We are seeking an individual with demonstrated excellence in both research and teaching. We currently have an undergraduate program in sociology and will be starting a graduate program soon. Applications must be submitted online by October 1, 2011, and must include the following: cover letter, cv, statement of research, teaching statement, 3 writing samples, and a list of 3 references. Assistant candidates (only) should have references send letters to sha.ref.soc11-12@ucmerced.edu.

For more information about the position, contact Nella Van Dyke: nvandyke@ucmerced.edu. To apply, please visit the UC Merced employment website.

Position: Sociology, Diversity, U.C. Berkeley

The University of California, Berkeley invites applications for a position as an Assistant Professor (tenure-track) in any of the following three areas: (1) Diversity and Identity; (2) Legal or Philosophical Frameworks for Diverse Democracies; and (3) Diversity, Civil Society and Political Action, or some combination thereof. The anticipated starting date is July 1, 2012. The search is part of the interdisciplinary Haas Diversity Research Center and will be conducted under the auspices of the Diversity and Democracy cluster of this Center.

Candidates are expected to have a Ph.D. or J.D. degree (preferably by July 1, 2012) in one of the following disciplines: law, philosophy, political science, or sociology; they should have a research and teaching portfolio that examines how our legal, political, and social institutions and practices adapt (or fail to adapt) to an increasingly multi-racial, multi-ethnic population. Special consideration will be given to candidates who work in any of the following areas: (1) the content and contestation of group identities; (2) the normative and legal implications of racial and ethnic diversity within democratic societies; (3) the civic and political engagement of diverse electorates within local, national, and transnational contexts.

This search will be conducted with the participation of the Departments of Sociology, Political Science, and Philosophy, and the School of Law (including its Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program). The successful candidate will hold a faculty appointment in a department to be determined by the candidate’s preferences, disciplinary training, and departmental fit. Applications must include a letter of interest, a CV, three letters of reference, and up to three significant writing samples. Please direct referees to the University’s statement on confidentiality. Qualified women and members of underrepresented minority groups are strongly encouraged to apply.

All documents should be submitted on-line to the Diversity and Democracy Search Committee. Review of applications will begin on September 30, 2011; applications must be received by October 14, 2011 to assure it will receive full consideration.

Position: Sociology, Race, Univ. of Pennsylvania

The Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in the sociology of race. We seek candidates with exceptionally strong research skills, who are also committed to undergraduate and graduate teaching.

Applications should be submitted online. Applications should include a curriculum vitae, a statement of research and teaching, and contact information for three individuals who have agreed to provide a letter of reference. Candidates are encouraged to apply by October 31, 2011.

Post Doc: African American Studies, Northwestern

The Department of African American Studies in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University invites applications for a two year Postdoctoral Fellowship. PhD must be completed by September 1, 2012. Recent Ph.D.s (degree granted during or after 2010) with a commitment to the field of African American and/or African Diaspora studies are encouraged to apply.

This two year fellowship is residential and provides a competitive stipend and benefits, a visiting appointment in the Department of African American Studies (including teaching of one or two classes in the Department), and participation in the intellectual life of the Department and University.

Applicants should submit one copy (postmarked no later than December 30, 2011) of:

  1. a current curriculum vitae
  2. a letter of application detailing the research project to be undertaken during the fellowship years
  3. a sample of scholarly writing
  4. evidence relating to the quality of teaching (syllabi and teaching evaluations)
  5. three letters of recommendation (including one letter from the dissertation advisor) to

Department of African American Studies
Northwestern University
1860 Campus Drive, Crowe 5-128
Evanston, IL 60208-2210
Attn: Postdoctoral Fellowship Search

All inquiries should be addressed to Suzette Denose at 847-491-5122 or s-denose@northwestern.edu.


September 16, 2010

Written by C.N.

Job Postings #4

The following are announcements about academic-related jobs for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues (listed in order of application deadline). As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes only and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Sociology, University of Dayton

Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track Assistant Professor position in sociology. We are seeking a Sociology Ph.D. with specialization in criminology and sociology of law to contribute to both the sociology and criminal justice studies majors (ABD will be considered). An ability to contribute to the interdisciplinary collaborations of the department is also desired. Candidates complementing the department’s focus on local and global communities and social justice are preferred. Preference will be given to applicants who have experience in teaching students from diverse backgrounds. This appointment begins August 16, 2011. Salary is competitive. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until October 15, 2010.

Online applications: https://jobs.udayton.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/frameset/Frameset.jsp?time=1283967872990

In order to complete your online application, you must attach a cover letter, your curriculum vita, and your statement of teaching philosophy. Copies of teaching evaluations and examples of syllabi and written work should be combined and attached to “other document.” Unofficial transcripts – graduate and undergraduate – may be combined and attached in one file in “transcripts.” Three original letters of reference should be mailed or emailed to: dsaswsearch@notes.udayton.edu.

SOC Search Committee
Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work
University of Dayton
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-1442

The University of Dayton, a comprehensive Catholic university founded by the Society of Mary (Marianists) in 1850, is Ohio’s largest independent university and one of the nation’s ten largest Catholic universities. The University of Dayton is firmly committed to the principle of diversity and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Persons of color, women, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply.

Sociology, Radford University

Special Purpose (non-tenure track, subject to annual reappointment) Assistant Professor. We are seeking a student-centered applied sociologist to begin August 2011. Ability to teach introduction to sociology required; ability to teach at least two of the following three areas preferred: social psychology, race and ethnicity, inequality. Successful applicants will: have an established and active record of teaching, professional activities, and service; be committed to building community-university partnerships and student-centered education; share in the effective mentoring of sociology majors; work with the department continue and expand applied educational activities, such as internships, undergraduate research, and service learning; contribute to departmental assessment; and consistently and responsibly perform departmental committee service.

Doctorate in Sociology preferred (ABD considered). Applicants must provide a letter of application identifying interest and experience in applied educational activities and specifying areas of expertise, a current vita, recent teaching evaluations (if available) and the names, addresses, and phone numbers of three references. Please do not send additional materials at this time. Applications should be sent to: Dr. Carole Seyfrit, Chair, Department of Sociology, Box 6948, Radford University, Radford, VA 24142 or e-mailed to CLSeyfrit@radford.edu. Review of applications will begin October 1 and continue until the position is filled.

Radford University is a co-educational, comprehensive, state supported institution located in southwestern Virginia, 40 miles from Roanoke, with an enrollment of approximately 9,600 students. For more information visit our website. Radford University is an Equal opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.

Sociology, University at Albany, SUNY

The Department of Sociology at the University at Albany invites applications for a tenure track position to begin in fall 2011. The position is contingent on final budget approval. Salary is competitive. Successful candidates will specialize in one of the following two areas: (1) Our first priority is in demography. Rank is open but preference will be given to candidates at the Associate or Full Professor level with an established track record of external funding. Candidates are expected to contribute to the research agenda of the Center for Social and Demographic Analysis. (2) Our second priority is for a candidate at the Assistant Professor level who conducts qualitative and/or ethnographic research. The substantive area is open but we are especially interested in the area of culture, gender, or urban sociology.

Candidates must demonstrate excellence in research and exhibit a strong commitment to teaching and service. Applicants must have a Ph.D. from a university accredited by the U.S. Department of Education or an internationally recognized accrediting organization. They must address in their applications their ability to work with and instruct a culturally diverse population. Applicants should send a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and three letters of reference; finalists will be asked to provide additional materials related to research and teaching. Applications will be screened beginning October 1. The University at Albany is an EO/AA/IRCA/ADA employer. All materials should be addressed to: Search Committee, Department of Sociology, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12222.

Sociology & International Studies, Boston College

The Department of Sociology and the International Studies Program invite applications for a tenure track assistant professor position with a cutting-edge research program in any of the following three areas: immigration, global environmental sociology, or global social movements. Scholars with expertise in any geographic area of the world are invited to apply. Scholars with substantive interest in: gender, race, class, sexuality, or religion/religious communities are particularly encouraged to apply. The tenure line is housed in the Sociology Department. The position, which begins in the Fall of 2011, entails half-time teaching in International Studies, which is an undergraduate major, and half-time graduate and undergraduate teaching in the Department of Sociology.

Applications should be submitted electronically to socchair@bc.edu. Potential applicants should email one attached pdf document containing the following: a cover letter that describes your research and teaching accomplishments and plans, current CV, and 2 pieces of recent scholarship. Applicants should arrange to have three letters of reference, also in pdf format, emailed to the same address. These references should be named in the letter of application. Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2010 and continue until the position is filled. Boston College is an Affirmation Action/Equal Opportunity employer. Applications from scholars of color and women are strongly encouraged.

Sociology, Loyola University New Orleans

The Department of Sociology has an anticipated opening for a tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level beginning August 2011. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Sociology. The successful candidate will assume the primary responsibility of teaching courses in undergraduate research methods and statistics; all other specialty areas will be considered. The Department of Sociology has approximately 80 majors, seven full-time faculty members, and offers a BA in Sociology with optional concentrations in three areas: Global Sociology; Stratification and Inequality; and Crime, Law, and Social Control. The Department of Sociology also contributes courses to a number of interdisciplinary minors, including Environmental Studies, Women’s Studies, African and African-American Studies, Latin American Studies, Legal Studies, and the newly created minor in New Orleans Studies.

Candidates must submit evidence of the skills needed to teach both research methods and statistics at the undergraduate level well as examples of quantitative scholarship. In addition to teaching responsibilities, colleagues are expected to advise undergraduate students, participate in department, college, and university committees, and maintain an active involvement in scholarly activities, including publication and securing outside funding. Candidates must be committed to excellence in undergraduate liberal arts education. The department has a strong commitment to teaching students to think critically about social justice principles and their realization in the community.

Loyola University is situated in uptown New Orleans with an approximate enrollment of 4600 students. Loyola is a Jesuit university known for its academic excellence, its commitment to social justice and community service as well as its commitment to Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employment. Loyola University New Orleans welcomes applications from women and minority candidates. Salary and benefits are competitive. Applicants must submit a letter describing their teaching and research interests with a brief statement of their personal education philosophy, a current Curriculum Vitae, three letters of recommendation (to be sent directly by the referees), an official transcript, samples of scholarship, samples of course syllabi, and evidence of teaching success (e.g., evaluations). Submit applications to:

Dr. Sue Mennino, Chair, Faculty Search Committee
Department of Sociology, Box 30
Loyola University New Orleans
6363 St. Charles Ave.
New Orleans, LA 70118.

Review of applications will begin October 15 and continue until the position is filled.

Social Movements and Social Justice, University of Southern California

The Department of American Studies & Ethnicity in the University of Southern California’s College of Letters, Arts & Sciences invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor with a research specialization that addresses the nature and evolution of U.S. social movements for economic, environmental, gender and/or racial justice. We are especially interested in scholars whose work is grounded in both theory and engagement with the social movements studied, and we are open to comparative, historical, and transnational approaches.

A broad range of graduate training specializations will be considered, including but not limited to American Studies, Sociology, Political Science, Urban Planning, and Feminist and Ethnic Studies. The position, beginning in fall 2011, will be in American Studies & Ethnicity, an interdisciplinary department, with significant opportunities to affiliate with campus research centers engaged in movement analysis.

USC strongly values diversity and is committed to equal opportunity in employment. Women and men, and members of all racial and ethnic groups, are encouraged to apply. Please send a letter of application, curriculum vitae, one or two short writing samples, and three letters of reference to: Manuel Pastor, Chair of Search Committee, Department of American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-4033. We will begin to review applications on November 1, 2010 and will continue until the position is filled. A Ph.D. is required by the start of employment.

Sociology, Florida State University

The Department of Sociology at Florida State University invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position, effective August 2011. We seek applicants with a primary emphasis in Race & Inequality who can also contribute to one of our other program areas: Health & Aging, Demography, or Social Psychology. Applications should include a personal letter, curriculum vitae, three letters of reference, and a writing sample. Screening will begin November 1 and continue until the position is filled. All application materials should be sent electronically to Isaac W. Eberstein, Chair, Department of Sociology, using this address: sociology@fsu.edu . Florida State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and race/ethnic minority applicants are particularly invited.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Immigration, Cornell University

Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Institute for the Social Sciences, ISS Immigration Theme Project.

Post-doctoral research associates are sought for participation in an interdisciplinary project on Immigration: Settlement, Integration, & Membership. Applications will be accepted for a one-year position, beginning approximately August 15, 2011. The project is led by an interdisciplinary team exploring two broad themes: immigrant settlement and integration, particularly in new receiving areas, and immigrant inclusion and membership. The project, coordinated by the Institute for the Social Sciences, will sponsor a seminar series, visiting scholars, and opportunities for multi-disciplinary research collaboration.

Postdocs will have access to the full range of university resources and receive an annual salary of $50,000 plus health benefits. Applicants must have a Ph.D. by August 15, 2011; scholars who have completed their Ph.D.’s within the past five years will be considered. The application deadline is November 15, 2010. Applicants should submit a curriculum vita, a brief statement of research interests, a writing sample, and three reference letters by e-mail to socialsciences@cornell.edu . Cornell is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer; minorities and women are encouraged to apply. Details are at: ISS Immigration Project and Cornell Office of Postdoctoral Studies.


July 26, 2010

Written by C.N.

Job Postings #1

The following are announcements about jobs for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues. As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes only and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor of Asian American Studies, The Claremont Colleges

The Intercollegiate Department of Asian American Studies at the Claremont Colleges and the Asian American Studies field group at Pitzer College invite applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Asian American Studies, to begin 1 July 2011.

The successful candidate should, by the beginning of the Fall 2011 semester, have a Ph.D. in ethnic studies, American Studies, or other disciplines or interdisciplinary studies appropriate to this subject. Candidates should have the ability to teach a community-based learning course and Asian American History. The department has identified a need for research and teaching expertise in Filipino, Muslim, Pacific Islander, South Asian, or Southeast Asian communities. We especially encourage candidates whose work takes place within frameworks of transnationalism and globalization.

Pitzer College, a member of the Claremont Colleges, has a strong institutional commitment to the principles of diversity in all areas and strongly encourages candidates from underrepresented social groups. We favor candidates who can contribute to the College’s distinctive educational objectives, which promote interdisciplinary perspectives, intercultural understanding, and concern with social responsibility and the ethical implications of knowledge and action. Pitzer College is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. For the successful applicant with the relevant interests, affiliations are possible with the intercollegiate departments of Africana Studies, Chicano/Latino Studies, and/or Women’s Studies.

To apply, send letter of application, curriculum vitae, selected evidence of excellence in teaching and research, statement of teaching philosophy, statement on social responsibility, a statement of research, and three letters of recommendation (at least one (1) of which addresses your teaching effectiveness) via email to “idaas_search@pitzer.edu.” Electronic documents should be sent in PDF format. Applications will be considered beginning September 17, 2010, until the position is filled.

Assistant Professor in Sociology, Univ. of Hawai’i West O’ahu

This position is responsible for teaching sociology courses in the Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences program. The teaching assignment is three courses per semester, including day, evening, and distance education courses. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to teaching a variety of sociology courses in areas consistent with personal interests and program needs. The successful candidate is also expected to engage in scholarly research and publication, committee service, student academic advising, and to participate in faculty governance.

Minimum qualifications: PhD from an accredited college or university in Sociology. (ABD candidates are eligible to apply, but must complete all degree requirements prior to the appointment.) Candidates must have a broad knowledge of sociology and a commitment to teaching excellence.

Desirable qualifications: Areas of specialization are open, but preference will be given to applicants prepared to teach at least two of the following: introductory sociology, social stratification, sociology of aging, medical sociology, sociological theory, writing-intensive courses, and demonstrated ability to teach using distance education technology.

To apply: Send a letter of application, curriculum vita, copies of transcripts (originals required at time of hire) and the names, addresses, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses of at least three professional references. All items become the property of the University of Hawai’i – West O’ahu. Application materials may also be e-mailed as an MS Word file attachment to delucchi@hawaii.edu. Closing date: Continuous – application review begins October 15, 2010.

Address:
University of Hawaii – West Oahu
Sociology Search Committee
96-129 Ala Ike
Pearl City, HI 96782

Inquiries: Dr. Michael Delucchi (phone: 808-454-4718, email: delucchi@hawaii.edu)

Lecturer in Asian American Studies, Univ. of California, Irvine

The Department of Asian American Studies at the University of California Irvine invites applications for a part-time Non Senate Faculty position with primary responsibility in teaching an upper division interdisciplinary course in Asian American Studies for 2010-11. Minimum base salary per course is $5579. The appointment dates would be as follows: Winter Quarter 2011 1/01/11-03/31/11 or Spring Quarter 2011 4/1/11 to 6/30/11.

We are looking for applicants who can teach the “Vietnamese American Experience” course.

Applicants with a Ph.D. preferred. Applicants who are ABD or have a M.A.; M.F.A. or equivalent will be considered. UC graduate students must have filed their dissertation or have a degree in hand by mid- December 2011 to be eligible to teach in Winter Quarter 2011 and by mid-March 2011 to be eligible to teach in Spring Quarter 2011.

Send materials via e-mail attachment to Jim Lee at jkl@uci.edu, followed by a hard copy of your application materials:

Cover letter

  • Curriculum vitae
  • Teaching evaluation summaries (no raw data needed)
  • Two letters of recommendations sent directly from the recommender
  • Complete sample syllabus of the course you are proposing
  • Indicate quarters available (Winter/Spring)

Applications will be accepted until positions are filled. However, to ensure fullest consideration, all applications materials should be submitted by August 31, 2010 to:

Jim Lee, Chair
Department of Asian American Studies
3000 Humanities Gateway
University of California Irvine
Irvine, CA 92697-6900

Program Coordinators of Multicultural Affairs, Duke Univ.

The Duke Center for Multicultural Affairs has launched a search for two Program Coordinator positions for our office. Each Program Coordinator will be expected to be knowledgeable of the histories, cultural and developmental issues of Native American, African American, Latino-American, South Asian American, East Asian American and South East Asian American ethnic communities.

In addition the Program Coordinator will be expected to provide a comprehensive program of services in the areas of community engagement, multicultural education and leadership development to empower students and their organizations to create an inclusive multicultural student community. This individual will also offer student club/organization advising, design experiential training in diversity education and multicultural competency to prepare students to participate in a complex global community.

Interested applicants should apply online through the Duke Human Resources website and find job requisition # 400413331. Please also find the position description below.

Specific Duties:
Program Development

  • Develop and implement programs that support academic persistence
  • Create and implement programs that promote skill development in diversity education and multicultural competency
  • Design programs that enhance knowledge and understanding of principles of social justice, activism and advocacy
  • Deliver educational presentations and other co-curricular programming such as informal and formal discussions in and outside of the classroom, house courses, film series, etc. on the issues pertaining to multicultural competency and social justice education
  • Evaluate and assess programmatic effectiveness through regular qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis such as focus groups, pre- and post-surveys, benchmark tracking, or other performance or outcome data

Student and Student Organization Advising

  • Hire, train and supervise undergraduate, graduate and professional student staff, interns and volunteers who work in the CMA
  • Advise multicultural student clubs and organizations
  • Develop a leadership curriculum that prepares students to lead their multicultural student organizations
  • Promote student group cross-cultural communication, inter/intra-group interaction and program collaboration

Administration

  • Complete all administrative duties including but not limited to financial paperwork in accordance with University policy and reports as assigned by the Assistant Director
  • Participate on the Campus Life Program Coordinator Group
  • Develop and maintain relationships with campus, community and alumni organizations that support the mission of the Center for Multicultural Affairs
  • Attend appropriate department, Division, and University meetings that support the goals of the Center for Multicultural Affairs
  • Participate in the design and implementation of short and long-term strategic planning and annual budgeting for the Center for Multicultural Affairs

General Qualifications:
Minimum educational requirement: Master’s Degree in relevant field. Strongly prefer 2-3 years experience as multicultural educator in a higher education setting.

Specific Skills and Competencies:
Position requires knowledge and understanding of American ethnic student communities in higher educational settings and ability to work with a diverse group of faculty, staff, students, alumni, and community members. Candidate must have excellent written, verbal and interpersonal skills, with a proven ability to work in a team environment. Outstanding organizational skills with ability to handle multiple projects/priorities and meet deadlines are required.

Policy Analyst, Citizenship & Immigration Services, Dept. of Homeland Security

Position: Policy Analyst (Research & Evaluation Division)
Department: Department Of Homeland Security
Agency: Citizenship and Immigration Services
Job Announcement Number: CIS-PJN-359063-OPP
Salary Range: $89,033.00 – $136,771.00 /year
Open Period: Wednesday, July 07, 2010 to Wednesday, July 28, 2010
Series & Grade: GS-0301-13/14
Position Information: Full Time Career/Career Conditional
Promotion Potential: 14
Duty Location: Washington DC
Who May Be Considered: United States Citizens

Job Summary: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services secures America’s promise as a nation of immigrants by providing accurate and useful information to our customers, granting immigration and citizenship benefits, promoting an awareness and understanding of citizenship, and ensuring the integrity of our immigration.

General Responsibilities of Policy Analysts:

  • Analyze, develop and review a variety of technical reports
  • Draft and review proposed legislation
  • Ensure effective coordination and integration of recommended policy

You will provide expert advice, analysis, and services on complex and sensitive issues related to the agency’s immigration policies and programs. Your duties will include the following:

  • Developing and managing quantitative and qualitative studies related to various immigration programs, policies, and petition types.
  • Analyzing, developing and reviewing a variety of technical reports and assessment instruments for use within the Agency.
  • Conducting and leading comprehensive studies on new and proposed policy initiatives, providing balanced information and analyses of the issues.
  • Preparing written analyses based on quantitative or qualitative findings of immigration program/policy studies.
  • Isolating and defining Agency conditions; developing study approaches, methods, techniques and hypotheses. Conducting and managing projects that may impact existing Agency processes, practices, or policy.
  • Identifying and evaluating the advantages and disadvantages, risks and benefits, or strengths and weaknesses of particular policy proposals.
  • Assessing the political and institutional environment in which decisions are made and implemented.
  • Ensuring effective coordination and integration of study findings in support of recommended policy changes or agency strategic plans.
  • Reviewing proposed legislation and drafting research reports and policy papers on research needs and study findings.
  • Representing the agency in dealings with interested groups and organizations regarding sponsored research and evaluations.
  • Participating with top agency officials and stakeholders in meetings, conferences, and symposia.

Sociology Professor, College of William and Mary

The College of William & Mary invites applicants for a tenure-eligible position to begin August 2011. Ph.D. in sociology or related field required. We seek a candidate with research and teaching expertise in the fields of race, ethnicity, or immigration studies. The successful candidate will assist in strengthening the department’s links with other programs in the College such as Africana Studies (including Black Studies) or Latin American/Latino Studies. Candidates with a comparative or international focus are encouraged to apply.

Application materials must be submitted electronically at the College’s online site at https://jobs.wm.edu. The following items are required, preferably in a PDF format: a curriculum vitae, a cover letter describing the candidate’s scholarship, teaching, and how these would enhance campus diversity, and three letters of reference (Applicants should submit the email addresses of recommenders via the online system). Review will begin October 1, 2010 and will continue until the position is filled.


March 5, 2010

Written by C.N.

Links & Announcements #22

Here are some more announcements and links out that have come my way relating to Asians or Asian Americans. As always, links to other sites are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of their contents.

Eva Lowe Fellowship for Social Justice

The Eva Lowe Fellowship for Social Justice at the Chinese Progressive Association. Applications due Monday March 8 , 2010.

Eva Lowe is a longtime progressive community activist who has committed her life to serving the community, she turns 101 this year. Born in Fort Bragg, California in 1909, she and her family went back and forth to China for education and to support the anti-imperialist movement. She was inspired by China’s movement and the women’s rights movement and got involved in many progressive issues. . . . Eva has dedicated her life to social and economic justice and believes that people should actively work to end imperialism and ‘fight for the underdog,’ the poor and working class community.

The Eva Lowe Fellowship for Social Justice provides a unique opportunity to a new generation of activists and organizers who want to build the power of and improve the lives of the working class Chinese immigrant community. During eight weeks of intensive training, ground work and reflection, Eva Lowe Fellows will learn about and support Chinese immigrant struggles in San Francisco, work to connect the larger API Movement across the country and build lasting relationships with peers, mentors and community members.

All placements for the program will be in San Francisco, California. Scholarships ranging from $500 – $2000 are available but students are also encouraged to seek additional and alternative funding sources (include campus work-study programs, scholarships and stipends). All other costs will the responsibility of each Fellow though some assistance may be offered to locate and secure housing. A maximum of four Fellows will be chosen for the 2010 year. Applications are due by Monday, March 8, 2010 at 5:00 pm. Applications can be filled out online at www.evalowe.org. We will announce the Fellowship recipients by March 20, 2010.

About the Chinese Progressive Association: Founded in 1972, the Chinese Progressive Association educates, organizes and empowers the low income and working class immigrant Chinese community in San Francisco to build collective power with other oppressed communities to demand better living and working conditions and justice for all people.

Organization of Chinese Americans & Verizon College Scholarship

The Organization of Chinese Americans (OCA), a national organization dedicated to advancing the social, economic, and political well-being of Asian Pacific Americans, is accepting applications from current undergraduate students for the OCA-Verizon College scholarship for fall semester 2010. This is a reminder that applications are due April 1, 2010.

Given the current recession, it is important to capitalize on all available resources. The OCA-Verizon College scholarship is a $2,000 award that will highlight your scholarly achievements, ease financial obstacles, and add prestige to your resumé. In order to be eligible, applicants must be a student who identifies as Asian Pacific American entering their sophomore, junior, or senior years, demonstrate financial need, be a permanent resident or US citizen, have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or above (on a 4.0 scale), and must be pursuing one of the following majors:

Accounting, Business Administration, Computer Electronics, Computer Programming, Computer Information Systems, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Economics, Electrical Engineering, Finance, HR Management, Industrial Engineering, Information Technology, International Business, Management Information Systems, Marketing, Mechanical Engineering, or Network Administration.

The application deadline is April 1, 2010, and must be completed online. If your school has a policy that prevents you from uploading your letter of recommendation, please contact me individually at iho@ocanational.org. For more information about the OCA-Verizon College scholarship or to access the application, please visit www.ocanational.org and click “Verizon College Scholarships” under “Programs.”

Sincerely,
IIMAY HO |Program Manager
OCA National Center
1322 18th Street NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-223-5500 tel
202-296-0540 fax
iho@ocanational.org
www.ocanational.org

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Internship

The White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (WHIAAPI) is responsible for the Department’s implementation of the Executive Order of October 14, 2009 which is designed to improve Federal efforts to develop, monitor, and coordinate executive branch efforts to improve the quality of life of AAPIs through increased participation in Federal programs. The Initiative is housed at the Department of Education, but represents a collaboration among many Federal agencies.

Intern Duties:

  • Perform research on and outreach to national and local AAPI organizations, elected officials, and ethnic media outlets
  • Conduct research on WHIAAPI issue areas, including education, commerce, health, housing, labor and employment, community and economic development as they relate to AAPIs

Intern Qualifications:

  • Currently enrolled undergraduate student (it is a requirement that interns be enrolled in school at least half time)
  • Great research skills
  • Experience working with AAPI community or familiarity with the issues
  • Detail-oriented
  • Team player

Compensation: interns are eligible for Transit Benefits, which cover the cost of commuting to and from work on public transportation. Interested applicants should send a resume and cover letter to Hallie Montoya Tansey at hallie.montoyatansey@ed.gov.

Administrative Assistant Job for Asian American Studies Program, Univ. of MD

The Asian American Studies Program at the University of Maryland (AAST) is hiring an Administrative Assistant. We are looking for someone with good communication and people skills. All are welcome to apply. Starting salary range is $30k to $36k. For more information, visit the University Human Resources website. Deadline is March 12, 2010.


July 31, 2009

Written by C.N.

Online Survey: Career Decisions by Chinese Americans

Below is another announcement about an online survey in need of Chinese American respondents:

Greetings. My name is William Nguyen, MA and I am a Ph. D Candidate at Alliant International University: CSPP. I am conducting a study that explores the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of Chinese American-identified undergraduate students attending a 2 or 4 year college/university in regards to their career decision-making process. I believe that the career theories currently in the literature fail to fully capture the Asian American experience and often neglect key facets of who we are: our culture, our experiences of acculturation, and the influence of honor and family.

If you are interested in participating, you will complete a 20 – 30 minute survey that asks you a myriad of questions related to your career decision-making process. All responses and identifying information will be kept confidential. As incentive for your participation, all participants that provide contact information will be entered in a raffle for either a $75, $50, or $25 gift card to Gap, Inc. (or any other department store of choice).

Should you have any questions about the research please contact: William Nguyen at wnguyen@alliant.edu. If you would like to participate, please click go to https://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=DQKGz8ZQQ58Uuyq4aROxvA_3d_3d. Also, if you are interested in receiving results to this study, please contact William Nguyen with that request. Thank you for your time and consideration.

In Peace,

William W. Nguyen, MA, Ph. D Candidate
Alliant International University: California School of Professional Psychology
San Francisco, CA


March 24, 2009

Written by C.N.

Blacks and Latinos Hurt More by Recession

In these tough economic times, Americans from all kinds of backgrounds are hurting financially. There seems to be depression reports in the news almost every day. Reports in the media have also focused a lot of attention on layoffs at large corporations, many of whom are shedding employees by the thousands. With that in mind, it may lead many of us to presume that middle class Whites are getting hit the hardest in this recession.

Certainly, many middle class Whites and their families are feeling the brunt of the recession and many find themselves struggling to make ends meet for the first time in their lives. However, as MSNBC reports, the data shows that on the aggregate level, it’s actually Blacks and Latinos that are being hit the hardest by the current recession:

Last hired, first fired: This generations-old cliche rings bitterly true for millions of Latinos and blacks who are losing jobs at a faster rate than the general population during this punishing recession. Much of the disparity is due to a concentration of Latinos and blacks in construction, blue-collar or service-industry jobs that have been decimated by the economic meltdown. . . .

Since the recession began in December 2007, Latino unemployment has risen 4.7 percentage points, to 10.9%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Black unemployment has risen 4.5 points, to 13.4%. White unemployment has risen 2.9 points, to 7.3%. . . .

William Darity, a Duke University professor, said that “blacks and Latinos are relative latecomers to the professional world … so they are necessarily the most vulnerable.” . . .

“Not saying that it’s racism,” [an executive search consultant] said, “but if a manager or a senior executive is looking at a slate of individuals and has to let one of them go, chances are he or she will not let the person go that they spend a lot of time with at the country club or similar places.”

My point is not to play the “Oppression Olympics” and to argue that this group is much better off than another group, or one group is more oppressed than another. Instead, I would like to place these findings in a larger sociological context.

Many Americans feel that our society, while still not a perfect meritocracy, offers Americans from all backgrounds the best opportunities for success and achieving the American dream than at any time in our history — that the playing field is more level and equal now than it’s ever been.

I would agree that the opportunities for socioeconomic success are the most equal that they’ve ever been in American history. But that does not mean that everybody is on an equal playing field. Instead, what this MSNBC article and other sociological studies have shown is that Blacks and Latinos continue to experience particular institutional disadvantages in their efforts to achieve economic equality with Whites.

Specifically, as the article points out, Blacks and Latinos tend to be disproportionately located in service and manual labor industries. Beyond the fact that these industries tend to pay lower wages in general, they are also highly vulnerable in times of economic recession and we’re seeing this play out right now. As such, Blacks and Latinos experience their first disadvantage.

Their second disadvantage is that even for Blacks and Latinos who have professional occupations that normally are well-paying, again as the article points out, they are relative newcomers to such occupations and as such, when layoffs come, they are more likely to lose their jobs due to the “last hired, first fired” principle.

The third point of disadvantage is that due to the legacy of systematic discrimination in the past, Blacks and Latinos have been unable to accumulate the same level of family wealth compared to Whites. This is even despite the fact that while the income gap between Whites and Blacks and Latinos has declined, the wealth gap has actually increased in the past several decades.

This wealth gap is important because it provides a cushion or barrier to soften loss of employment and other financial difficulties. Therefore, because Blacks and Latinos have less accumulated wealth than Whites, they have a much smaller cushion to fall back on and therefore, are more susceptible to financial catastrophes.

Ultimately, these institutional disadvantages play a large part in why Blacks and Latinos seem to struggle more than Whites or Asian Americans when it comes to achieving economic success. They may be well-educated, motivated, and hard-working, but they also have to overcome more structural inequalities and barriers that make them more financially vulnerable in times of recession.


January 26, 2009

Written by C.N.

Asian Americans and Workplace-Employment Discrimination

In my article on Employment and Occupational Patterns, I described how, despite the fact that many Asian American work in high-status, well-paying jobs, unfortunately many still experience glass ceiling barriers (sometimes referred to as the ‘bamboo ceiling’ for Asian Americans) and other mechanisms of discrimination in the workplace.

To give us a more detailed picture of this issue, a new report by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC, the federal agency in charge of enforcing employment non-discrimination laws) has just released a new study on the extent of workplace discrimination against Asian Americans in federal government jobs (thanks to AngryAsianMan for blogging about this first).

First, a little background data: this report only looked at Asian American workers who work for federal government agencies. According to EEOC data, there are about 2.6 million federal employees and Asian American comprise about 6% of them. That works out to be around 156,000 Asian American federal government workers.

In comparison, there are about 5.2 million Asian Americans in the total civilian labor force. So of all Asian American workers, around 3% work for the federal government. That may not seem to be a lot but in many ways, we might expect the federal government to be more attuned to racial discrimination in their ranks compared to the private sector. So how did Asian American federal workers fare in this regard?

AAPIs have been called the “model minority,” but this community seems to be the “forgotten minority.” This community has been facing a number of misperceptions or stereotypes – for example, AAPIs are quiet, hardworking, family-oriented, technically-oriented, good at math and science, but are also passive, non-confrontational and antisocial.

However, while some of these stereotypes have positive characteristics, they have become the framework of barriers establishing glass or bamboo ceilings which prevent AAPIs from moving into the upper tiers of an organization. In addition, AAPIs face sticky floors which hold AAPIs at a particular level for a prolonged period of time and other obstacles. . . .

[A Gallup survey in 2005 found that] 31% of Asians surveyed reported incidents of discrimination, the largest percentage of any ethnic group. . . . [However, EEOC data] shows that only about 2% of all charges in the private sector and 3.26% in the federal sector are filed by AAPIs. There is more discrimination occurring in the workplace than is being reflected in our charge/complaint statistics.

The report notes that among all federal government agencies, the Broadcasting Board of Governors has the highest Asian American representation at 13.5% while the Tennessee Valley Authority has the lowest at 0.3%. Also significant is that across virtually all federal agencies, compared to their overall representation with a particular agency, Asian Americans are consistently underrepresented as mid-level supervisors and as executives.

Although the report does not provide many specific examples of discrimination against Asian American federal government employees, its summary of the barriers that they face are very similar to the ones I identified in my own article that I cited in the first paragraph: model minority perceptions leading to narrow and limiting assignments, language and accent discrimination, perceptions of foreignness, perceptions of social deficiency, and perceptions of lack of leadership.

Finally, the EEOC’s recommendations are:

  • Strong leadership and personal commitment to diversity comes from the top down. Hopefully Barack Obama will fulfill his promise to work toward ending this underrepresentation of Asian Americans in the federal government.
  • Strengthen commitment to diversity among agency leadership. This is not just to be politically correct — there is a solid business case to be made that for the U.S. to stay ahead and succeed in the international, globalized economy, its workforce needs to include a broad range of backgrounds, talent, and skills.
  • Ensure that supervisor/manager assessments of their Asian American employees are fair, objective, and free from the cultural biases that I listed above.
  • Ensure that the EEOC agency itself does its job properly in terms of being accessible to Asian American employees who have a complaint and in properly investigating such complaints. Hopefully this will also be easier to do under our new (Democratic) administration.
  • Collaborate with Asian American community organizations and leaders to encourage Asian Americans to work for the federal government and to increase their levels of representation within federal agencies.
  • Actively support Asian American employee groups. Rather than promoting “balkanization” as some critics have charged, these ethnically-focused support groups actually lead to greater worker loyalty, productivity, and satisfaction.
  • Finally, give Asian American federal employees who do have documented skill deficiencies the opportunities and resources to address them and to improve their skills and qualifications so that they can perform better and be promoted more easily.

As the saying goes, all these things are easier said than done. Nonetheless, I am very confident that Barack Obama’s administration will give closer attention to these kinds of issues within the federal government and that things are looking up for Asian American employees. In other words, there is a new sheriff in town and things are going to change around here.


March 2, 2006

Written by C.N.

Asian Workers Report the Most Discrimination

The Washington Post describes a recent study conducted by the Gallup Organization that measured self-reported incidences of workplace discrimination. Among other things, the report notes that the Asian Americans report the highest rates of discrimination in the workplace:

For example, 31 percent of Asians surveyed reported incidents of discrimination, the largest percentage of any racial or ethnic group, with African Americans the second-largest group at 26 percent. But Asians generally file fewer discrimination complaints than other groups, according to the EEOC. . . .

The Gallup poll found that the most frequent type of discrimination cited by respondents reporting bias (26 percent) was sex bias, followed by race (23 percent) and age (17 percent). Women were more than twice as likely as men to say they had encountered bias. Some types of discrimination reported in the poll are not clearly covered by federal law, including favoritism, sexual orientation and language. . . .

The most frequent reports of discrimination were in promotion decisions (33 percent of those claiming bias) and pay (29 percent). But workers interviewed during the poll also reported bias manifested in harassment, work conditions and assignments.

The article goes on to document several recent lawsuits alleging systematic workplace discrimination, brought against notable companies such as Best Buy, AutoNation, Morgan Stanley, Boeing, Eastman Kodak, BellSouth, and Wal-Mart.

I find it quite interesting that although Asian Americans report the highest levels of workplace discrimination, they tend to be the least likely to actually file a discrimination complaint against their employer. Sadly, it looks like the cultural image of Asian Americans as quiet, docile, and therefore, easy to pick on and discriminate against is apparently true.

It is certainly unacceptable that Asian Americans are apparently encountering so much workplace discrimination. No group deserves to be treated with contempt or hostility in that manner. At the same time, perhaps one of the reasons why Asian Americans experience the most discrimination is because not enough of us actually fight back, which can then encourage even more discrimination against us.

In other words, at some point we as Asian Americans have to stand up, speak out, and demand our rights to equal treatment. No one else is going to do it for us. Until we collectively demonstrate that discriminating against Asian Americans will lead to the same kind of consequences as that committed against Blacks, we will continue to be seen as an easy target, plain and simple.