Topics & Articles

Home

Culture

Ethnic Groups

History

Issues

Links

Viet Nam



Search

or Browse the Archives

or Gets Posts by Tags



Most Popular Books on Asian-Nation

Miscellaneous

All posts copyright © 2001- by C.N. Le.
Some rights reserved. Creative Commons License

The views and opinions expressed on this site and blog posts (excluding comments on blog posts left by others) are entirely my own and do not represent those of any employer or organization with whom I am currently or previously have been associated.

Blog powered by WordPress


Behind the Headlines: APA News Blog

Academic Version: Applying my personal experiences and academic research as a professor of Sociology and Asian American Studies to provide a more complete understanding of political, economic, and cultural issues and current events related to American race relations, and Asia/Asian America in particular.

Plain English: Trying to put my Ph.D. to good use.

June 28, 2013

Written by C.N.

Links, Jobs, & Announcements #75

Here are some more announcements, links, and job postings about academic-related jobs, fellowships, and other opportunities for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues, with a particular focus on Asian Americans. As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Fellowship: Center for Asian American Media

© Corbis

Armed With a Camera Fellowship

In its twelfth season, the successful Armed With a Camera (AWC) Fellowship for Emerging Media Artists nurtures the next generation of Asian Pacific American media artists to capture their world, surroundings and outlook on life. Visual Communications works with the Fellows for seven months and provides special training, mentoring and networking opportunities, access to facilities and equipment, plus a cash and rental stipend to create four to five-minute digital shorts that premiere at the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival and other venues nationwide.

The 2013-2014 Armed With A Camera Fellowship is accepting submissions May 15 – August 2, 2013. Up to 10 artists will be selected for the Fellowship. We will announce the new class of Fellows in September.

Visual Communications (VC) seeks to cultivate a new generation of Asian Pacific American media artists committed to preserving the legacy and vision of VC. The Armed With A Camera Fellowship will award up to ten fellows $1,000 in cash and $1,000 in equipment rental to complete a four to five-minute digital video. Through the Armed With A Camera Fellowship, emerging media artists will capture their world, surroundings and outlook on life as a part of a new generation of Asian Pacific Americans.

Final projects must be shot in digital video format and completed by March 21, 2014. A special program will showcase all completed projects at various VC exhibitions across the city of Los Angeles, including the 2014 Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival and other venues nationwide. VC will co-own the productions and will also package and distribute completed works. Distribution income will aid in the continuation of the Armed with a Camera Fellowship.

Applicant Eligibility
Eligible applicants must be of Asian Pacific descent and residents of Southern California. If accepted, Fellows must be able to attend mandatory meetings and workshops in Los Angeles. Women, South Asian and Southeast Asian filmmakers are highly encouraged to apply to the AWC Fellowship. If you’re not sure of your eligibility, please contact Visual Communications.

For more details on how to apply for the Armed With A Camera Fellowship, visit the Visual Communications website.

Online Survey: Asian American LGB

My name is Brianna Werner, and I am a research assistant to Dr. Frances Shen, a faculty member at the University of Illinois Springfield. We are in need of university student participants to complete a survey on the impact of discrimination on Asian American LGB persons.

We are seeking individuals who (1) identify as Asian American, (2) identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual, and (3) are at least 18 years of age to complete a confidential web-based survey that will ask you about the impact of discrimination on Asian American LGB persons.

The entire study should take approximately 30-40 minutes. The answers you provide will be kept completely confidential. You will not be asked to provide your name on the inventory. This research has been reviewed and approved by the UIS Human Subjects Review Officer, Dr. Lynn Pardie. Dr. Pardie can be reached at 217-206-7230 to answer any questions about your rights as a volunteer participant in this study.

As a thank you, participants who complete the survey can enter into a lottery drawing to win one of four $25 gift certificates or one of four $50 gift certificates.

For more information about the study, and to participate, please go to https://illinois.edu/sb/sec/4852751.

Sincerely,
Brianna Werner
Dr. Frances Shen

Online Survey: Interracial Relationships

You are invited to participate in a study exploring relationships among People of Color. The requirements are as follows: you must be 18 years of age or older; a Person of Color, and be involved in an interracial relationship for a minimum of one year. Participation in this study is voluntary and anonymous and you will not be compensated.

If you would like to participate or have any questions please contact Magie S. Maekawa at magiemaekawa@gmail.com or click on the following hyperlink: https://csulapsychology.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_ebQFLDRt1n30oHX.

Thank you very much,
Magie S. Maekawa

Call for Submissions: Race & Social Problems Journal

Call for Papers: Submit your manuscript for publication in Race and Social Problems.

We welcome manuscripts that explore, but are not limited to, such topics as criminal justice, economic conditions, education, the elderly, families, health disparities, mental health, race relations, and youth.

To submit a manuscript, please visit www.crsp.pitt.edu/publications/CallForPapers.pdf. Articles in the journal are available for free online at http://link.springer.com/journal/12552. In 2014, there will be a special issue on Asian Americans. You may submit your manuscript to www.crsp.pitt.edu/publications/SpecialIssueCallforPapers2013-2.pdf.

Expected future special issues of Race and Social Problems include the following:

  • Women of Color, 2015
    Race and Religiosity, 2016
    Race and Education, 2017
    Race and Aging, 2018

June 14, 2013

Written by C.N.

Links, Jobs, & Announcements #74

Here are some more announcements, links, and job postings about academic-related jobs, fellowships, and other opportunities for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues, with a particular focus on Asian Americans. As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Position: Asian American Studies, CUNY

© Corbis

The Asian American Studies Program at CUNY unexpectedly needs to find an instructor to teach our introductory survey course, Asians in the U.S. (ASIAN 210) for this fall. The course is already scheduled for Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7:00 – 8:15pm; students have registered, so there is unfortunately no leeway in terms of rescheduling.

The ideal candidate is someone from an interdisciplinary (preferably social science) background who can present a knowledgeable and enthusiastic introduction to the field – key texts, concepts, etc. – while also illustrating the relevance of AAS in a contemporary context (e.g. post-9/11 detention and deportation, DACA, Fisher v. UT Austin, etc.).

Very briefly, ASIAN 210 examines historical and contemporary Asian American experience in the context of American historical racial, labor and foreign policy developments and the impact of the current rapid expansion of Asian American communities on America’s social and political order. Here is an example of one instructor’s course description:

In Asian 210, we will read about and discuss the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian Americans living in the United States, looking at the historical origins of what it means to be ‘Asian American,’ as well as the social, political, cultural, and economic implications of this term. Students will learn about concepts having to do with the social construction of race, ideology, class-consciousness, gender, sexuality, pan-Asian solidarity, media representations, political activism, as well as the history and future of the field of Asian American Studies.

In our readings and conversations, we will focus our attention on three different areas: Asian American history (as seen in Ronald Takaki’s Strangers from a Different Shore), theoretical foundations within Asian American Studies (in Wu and Song’s Asian American Studies: A Reader), as well as a wide range of literary works (presented in Hagedorn’s anthology Charlie Chan is Dead 2). In addition, we will screen a number of film- and video-based pieces (documentary, experimental, and feature-length) that expand on issues in the class.

Interested candidates should contact me via email and include their CVs and a cover letter that includes a brief pedagogical statement.

Many thanks,

Jennifer Hayashida, Director
Asian American Studies Program
Hunter College, CUNY
695 Park Avenue, Rm 1338 West
New York, NY 10065
212.772.5660
jennifer.hayashida@hunter.cuny.edu
www.hunter.cuny.edu/aasp

Position: Director of APIA Affairs, Univ. of Florida

My name is Kayla Tran and I serve as the University of Florida’s Asian American Student Union President. UF has been on the search for our next APIA Director since March, and would greatly appreciate assistance in spreading the word about this job opening.

As you may already know, the southeastern U.S. is a region that has yet to fully access AA resources and expertise, so you can imagine the growing amount of diversity opportunities at our flagship university. The individual to fill this position will have full autonomy of programming and communication with students, faculty and staff to shape the UF APIA community and environment.

The application deadline is Monday June 23, 2013 and a full job description can be found at https://jobs.ufl.edu/postings/41708. A brief summary of the position is below:

The Director of Asian Pacific Islander American (APIA) Affairs is a vital member of Multicultural and Diversity Affairs in the Division of Student Affairs. This position provides leadership, education, and services for the students regarding multicultural awareness and by creating an inclusive campus community. The Director of APIA Affairs coordinates and plans multicultural and intercultural education activities, trainings and programs for the campus community that educate and promote awareness, understanding and appreciation of diversity and multiculturalism on campus. The Director is also responsible for the support of the Asia

Please help my fellow Gators in whatever means you feel comfortable with: by passing this along to anybody who may be interested, inclusion a communications newsletter, etc.

Thank you in advance for your earnest attention and assistance to this process,
Kayla Tran

Call for Papers: New Journal in Asian & Asian American Studies

Verge: Studies in Global Asias
Senior Editors, Tina Chen and Eric Hayot

Verge: Studies in Global Asias is a new journal that includes scholarship from scholars in both Asian and Asian American Studies. These two fields have traditionally defined themselves in opposition to one another, with the former focused on an area-studies, nationally and politically oriented approach, and the latter emphasizing epistemological categories, including ethnicity and citizenship, that drew mainly on the history of the United States.

The past decade however has seen a series of rapprochements in which, for instance, categories “belonging”to Asian American Studies (ethnicity, race, diaspora) have been applied with increasing success to studies of Asia. For example Asian Studies has responded to the postnational turn in the humanities and social sciences by becoming increasingly open to rethinking its national and regional insularities, and to work that pushes, often literally, on the boundaries of Asia as both a place and a concept.

At the same time, Asian American Studies has become increasingly aware of the ongoing importance of Asia to the Asian American experience, and thus more open to work that is transnational or multilingual, as well as to forms of scholarship that challenge the US-centrism of concepts governing the Asian diaspora.

Verge showcases scholarship on “Asian” topics from across the humanities and humanistic social sciences, while recognizing that the changing scope of “Asia” as a concept and method is today an object of vital critical concern. Deeply transnational and transhistorical in scope, Verge emphasizes thematic and conceptual links among the disciplines and regional/area studies formations that address Asia in a variety of particularist (national, subnational, individual) and generalist (national, regional, global) modes.

Responding to the ways in which large-scale social, cultural, and economic concepts like the world, the globe, or the universal (not to mention East Asian cousins like tianxia or datong) are reshaping the ways we think about the present, the past and the future, the journal publishes scholarship that occupies and enlarges the proximities among disciplinary and historical fields, from the ancient to the modern periods. The journal emphasizes multidisciplinary engagement—a crossing and dialogue of the disciplines that does not erase disciplinary differences, but uses them to make possible new conversations and new models of critical thought.

Queries and Submissions should be sent to: verge@psu.edu

Issue 1: Open Issue

The history of scholarship on Asian America, when juxtaposed with the fields of Asian Studies, reminds us how much nations, national movements, and other forms of national development continue to exert powerful effects on the world in which we live. Such movements also remind us of the importance of inter-nationalism, of the kinds of networks that can spring up between states and which can work to disrupt the smooth passage of the planet into a utopian post-national future. The growing interest in the global and the transnational across disciplines thus brings the various Asia-oriented fields and disciplines—history and literature, Asia and Asian America, East and South, modern and premodern—closer together.

This inaugural issue seeks to feature work that illustrates the diverse engagements across disciplines (literature, history, sociology, art history, political science, geography) and fields (Asian Studies and Asian American Studies) that are possible once we begin thinking about the possible convergences and divergences such divisions have traditionally represented. We welcome a range of perspectives; featured contributors include Ien Ang, Dean Chan, Alexandra Chang, Catherine Ceniza Choy, Magnus Fiskejo, Pika Ghosh, Evelyn Hu-Dehart, Yunte Huang, Suk-young Kim, Joachim Kurtz, Meera Lee, Wei Li, Colleen Lye, Sucheta Mazumdar, Tak-wing Ngo, Haun Saussy, David Palumbo-Liu, Sheldon Pollack, Shuh-mei Shih, Eleanor Ty, and Jeffrey Wasserstrom.

Submission deadline: December 1, 2013

Issue 2: Asian Empires & Imperialism (edited by On-cho Ng and Erica Brindley)

The nature of Asian empires in the past, as well as the definition of imperialism in contemporary times, is a topic of ongoing discussion among scholars from a wide range of fields. In this special issue of Verge, we will explore a cluster of issues concerning the mechanics and influence of empires, imperial authority, and imperial types of influence over indigenous cultures and frontiers in Asia, as well as their diasporas abroad and in the USA.

We invite submissions that address one or some of the following questions: How did various imperial efforts interact with local concerns to shape the history of cross-cultural interactions in this region? How did imperial regimes propose to solve the issue of a multi-ethnic empire? What were the roles of specific geographic and economic spheres in Asia (such as those of nomadic, agricultural, maritime, high altitude or lowland, and far-flung/diasporic cultures) in contributing to the distinctive quality of certain empires? How do certain characteristics of imperial administration and control in Asia compare to those of imperial states in other regions of the world?

In addition to questions concerning the long history of Asian imperialism and comparisons with other empires, we also solicit submissions that speak to questions concerning contemporary Asian diasporas and their reactions to various forms of imperialism in the modern age. Questions might address such topics as “Yellow Peril” fears about Asian cultural imperialism; Japanese internment camps as a US response to Japanese imperial expansion in the Pacific; the Tibetan diaspora in South Asia and the Americas as a reaction to contemporary Chinese imperialism; Vietnamese responses to French, Chinese, or American imperialisms, and the treatment of Japanese-Americans in Hawaii in the aftermath of Pearl Harbor.

Submission deadline: April 1, 2014

Issue 3: Collections (edited by Jonathan Abel and Charlotte Eubanks)

As a construct and product of powerful institutions from empires, to nation-states, museums, to universities, Asia has long been formulated at the level of the collection. Whether through royal court poetry compilations, colonial treasure hunters, art historians, bric a brac shop keepers, or librarians of rare archives, the role of collecting and classification has been deeply connected not only to definitions of what counts as Asia and who can be considered Asian, but also to how Asia continues to be configured and re-configured today.

With this in mind, this special issue of Verge seeks to collect papers on the history, finance, psychology, politics and aesthetics of collecting Asia in Asia and beyond. This collection hopes not only to bring into relief how “Asia” has been created but also to promote new definitions of Asia. What, for instance, are the historical implications of government-sponsored poetry anthologies in Mughal India, Heian-era Japan, or 20th century North Korea? What do the contents of treasure-houses — at Angkor Wat, Yasukuni Shrine, or Vishwanath — tell us about evolving concepts of art and of the elasticity of cultural and national contours?

When did Japan become a geographical base for the collection of Asia? Who collects Chinese books? How has Indian art been defined by curatorial practices? Why did South Korea begin to collect oral histories in the 1990s? What politics lie behind the exhibition of mainland Chinese posters in Taiwan? How much money do cultural foundations spend on maintaining collections? Where are the limits of Asian collections in geographical and diasporic terms? How do constructions of these collections impact our views of the collective, whether of Tibetan exiles in Dharamsala, Japanese internment camps in Indonesia, global Chinatowns, or adherents of new Asian religions in the Americas and former Soviet Republics?

This issue is interested in the various cultures of collecting Asia and collecting Asians, in the many politics of collecting, in the odd financial restrictions on collectors, in the psychology of collecting, in the anthropology of how communities form around collected objects, and in the sociology around collective histories.

Submission deadline: November 15, 2014

Issue 4: Asian Urbanisms and Urbanizations (edited by Madhuri Desai and Shuang Shen)

In the contemporary age of globalization, the city has gained new importance and attention as a center of information industry, a node of transnational and translocal networks, and a significant site of capital, labor migration and culture (Saskia Sassen, Manuel Castells and David Harvey). While this renewed interest in the city both perpetuates and revises theories of the city as a metaphor of modernity (Walter Benjamin, Georg Simmel), it also opens up questions regarding the uniqueness and relevance of earlier cities and their experience of urbanization. When we move us away from Eurocentric understandings of modernity and time, it becomes increasingly possible to study non-European urbanisms in the past and at present with theoretical rigor and historical specificity.

For this special issue, we invite submissions (around 8000 words) that explore urbanism as a site of comparison and connection among various Asian locales and beyond. We are interested in not just studies of Asian cities and their urban experience but also how “Asia” has been imagined both historically and contemporaneously, through urbanism and urbanization, and how “Asia” as a term of travel is registered in the urban space. This special issue will draw attention to the following questions: As cities become increasingly connected and similar to each other, how do they express their distinct identities as well as articulate their unique histories?

Besides circulation, movement, and networks that have been much emphasized in contemporary studies of the city, how do borders, checkpoints, and passwords function in urban contexts? How does the city articulate connections between the local, the national, and the transnational? How does the Asian experience of urbanization and ideas surrounding Asian urbanism revise, rethink, and in some cases revive Asia’s colonial past? What does the Western perspective on some Asian cities as unprecedented and futuristic tells us about the imagination of Asia in the global context? How do migrant and ethnic communities negotiate with and redefine the public space of the city? How is the urban public shared or fragmented by co-existing ethnic and religious communities? How is the rising cosmopolitanism of these cities challenged through migration and sharply defined ethnic and religious identities? We invite submissions that address these questions within the context of Early modern, colonial and contemporary urbanisms and urbanizations.

Deadline: June 1, 2015

New Film: “Fading Away”

There are more than 3.9 million Korean War veterans and over 6.8 million American veterans who served in the Korean War. Now in their 80s, they are beginning to fade away, like their memories. As the weight of age falls heavier upon them, their voices grow quieter as they retreat into silence. With no one asking about their stories, they have no one to tell – until now.

“Fading Away” showcases a series of never before told stories from a group of unique Korean War veterans and refugees through a series of insightful interviews and the use of rare historical film footage, photos and other archival material. These veterans and survivors share their stories in their own words with their sons, daughters and grandchildren with memories of catastrophe, fear, and the pains they vividly remember.


March 18, 2011

Written by C.N.

Links, Jobs, & Announcements #40

Here are some more announcements, links, and job postings about academic-related jobs, fellowships, and other related opportunities for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues. As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Job: Vietnamese Interpreters in Orange County, CA

Are you bilingual in Vietnamese and English? Are you looking for positions that pays $17.00 an hour or more? Superior Court of Orange County is now accepting applications from candidates that are Bilingual in Vietnamese and English.

The Court has numerous full-time positions and some part-time positions that serve the public and/or work in a call center environment that utilize bilingual skills. Qualified candidates will earn an additional $0.58 or $1.15 an hour on top of the hourly base pay for meeting our bilingual requirements. Current needs are in Laguna Hills; however, we also have work locations in Westminster, Santa Ana, Newport Beach, Fullerton, Irvine, and Orange.

For more information about the positions and how to apply, visit our website.

Position: English, Hawai’i Pacific University

The Department of English, Hawai’i Pacific University, invites applications for 1 full-time, career-track (in lieu of a tenure system, HPU uses a “career-track” system consisting of 5 years of renewable reappointments (two 1-year and a 3-year contract) culminating in “career” status consisting of a series of 5-year contracts) faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor for a nine-month appointment to begin Fall 2011. We are seeking applicants with a background in film/media studies or world literature. The successful applicant will be expected to teach a combination of 24 credits (typically 8 classes) of courses in first-year composition; general education, literature, film/media studies, and/or cultural studies; and upper-division English courses in the candidate’s area of specialty. Development of upper-level courses related to area of expertise is also expected as is participation in University and community service.

Minimum qualifications: Candidates for the position should have a Ph.D. in English. ABD will be considered if degree can be completed within first year of appointment. Desired qualifications: Evidence of successful teaching in composition and literature, media studies, or culture studies preferred. The successful applicant must also demonstrate a sincere interest and ability in undergraduate teaching in a multicultural environment, a promising record of scholarship, and an interest in faculty/student extracurricular activities and program review.

To Apply: Applicants should apply online. Supporting documents such as curriculum vitae, three letters of reference, a statement of teaching philosophy, evidence of teaching experience, and description of professional development goals may be submitted electronically as Word or PDF files put together in a ZIP file named with the last name and position number (ex: Jones ####) and e-mailed to HR@hpu.edu. Paper submissions of supporting documents are also accepted at Human Resources: Hawai‘i Pacific University HR Department; 1132 Bishop Street, Suite 310; Honolulu, HI 96813. E-mail: hr@hpu.edu. FAX: 808-544-1192. Review of applications may begin on March 15, 2011.

Department Contact address: Dr. Laurie Leach, 808-544-1103.

Position: Field Manager, The Leadership Conference

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights (The Leadership Conference) is the leading coalition of organizations committed to civil and human rights in the United States and The Leadership Conference Education Fund is the major research and education organization supporting the coalition. We are seeking applicants for the position of field manager with a background in social media organizing, among other qualifications. It’s a great opportunity to work on multiple civil and human rights issues with a diverse range of groups and communities, nationally and at the state and local level.

Description
The Field Manager will be responsible for a variety of tasks within the Department of Field Operations (DFO). The employee in this position will report to the Vice President, Field Operations, with guidance from the Deputy Field Director(s).

Skills and Qualifications
The job requires a commitment to civil and human rights; organizing and outreach experience; a demonstrated ability to manage multiple tasks; planning and coordinating skills; excellent interpersonal skills; and the ability to work in a fast-paced environment and adhere to deadlines. Minimum requirements are a Bachelors degree; a minimum of three years of field/grassroots experience, preferably with a focus on the creation of materials and tools designed for community leaders and grassroots campaigns; and a demonstrated understanding of and proficiency in the use of social media and web activism software, and Microsoft applications.

Excellent writing and verbal skills, particularly as related to drafting and creating field materials and tools; desire and ability to work with diverse groups of people; desire and ability to manage a complex, ever-changing workload; ability to organize time efficiently; ability to work with intra-departmental teams, interns, and community leaders; and a high level of personal energy and commitment to civil and human rights are essential. Hill experience not required, however a plus.

This is a mid-level position at the center of the organizations’ major work. The employee will have the opportunity to work with the DFO to participate in and/or lead field campaigns to activate the grassroots on critical civil and human rights issues. The employee will play a key role in developing and advancing grassroots strategy on the major priority issues of The Leadership Conference. S/he will also be exposed to the most broad-based civil and human rights coalition in the country, and to participatory democracy at its best.

Duties and Responsibilities
Work directly with the Vice President for Field Operations and field team to:

  • Envision and draft materials, alerts and tools for grassroots activists, community leaders, and the civil and human rights coalition as the DFO develops field campaigns on priority Leadership Conference issues
  • Work with the field team to devise a strategy around components of online activism, such as Internet action alerts, social networking systems and innovative web-based outreach
  • Serve as DFO representative on the intra-departmental Online Strategy Group
  • Devise grassroots outreach and activation strategies on organizational priority issues, with a particularized focus on developing written materials and social media tools for national, state, and local partners’ use
  • Plan, manage and maintain effective technical support for members of the coalition in their efforts to activate the grassroots and for state and local partner organizations as they implement grassroots campaigns
  • Drive and monitor the development of field outreach, public education, and capacity campaigns in a set of key states as they relate to the organizations’ priority issues and areas of focus
  • Work with the DFO to develop grassroots coalitions in key states and to organize national grassroots task force meetings
  • Participate in department, All-Staff, team, and other meetings as needed

Salary and Benefits
This is a mid-level position with a starting salary in the mid forties.

To Apply
Send resume and cover letter, by March 31, 2011, via email to personnel@civilrights.org with Field Manager in the subject line; fax to (202) 466-3435, or mail to:

The Leadership Conference /The Leadership Conference Education Fund
1629 K Street, N.W., 10th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20006
Attention: Field Manager Search

No telephone inquiries, please.

Reality Show Call for Participants: Asian American Families

We have been commissioned by the BBC to make a programme on family values and parenting in different nations and cultures all over the world. We are now in the 4th series of this very popular programme but have yet to represent a family of Asian origin – and would very much like to do so in the States in the coming weeks.

We are reaching out to families ( with teens) and are hoping that a loving, but disciplined family will be interested in participating in the series whereby they ‘host’ 2 British teenagers for a week, instilling in them the values and morality they demand of their own children. This very popular programme has already met and filmed inspirational families in countries ranging from South Africa to India, US to Lebanon.

If you know of any families who are interested in participating, you can contact me at my email below.

Kind regards,
Rebecca
rebeccasymons@twentytwenty.tv

Online Survey: Asian American Values

I am a doctoral candidate from the Department of Counseling and Human Development Services at the University of Georgia under the direction of Dr. Brian Glaser. I invite you to participate in a research study entitled “A Study of Scale Construction in the Asian American/Pacific Islander Population”. The purpose of this study is to investigate the values system within the Asian American/ Pacific Islanders (AAPI) population in order to create a scale that accurately quantifies these values.

You are invited to participate in a study investigating value systems in the Asian-American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) population. Any self-identified AAPI or with AAPI heritage, ages 18 and over, are welcome to participate. If you agree to participate, you will be asked to answer a series of question reflecting your values system as part of a larger study to create a measurement scale. Your answers will remain anonymous.

The scale consists of 46 items and will take approximately 5-20 minutes to complete. By taking part in this study, your responses may help improve the conceptualization and treatment of AAPI clients in therapy. If you have any questions or concerns, please refer to the informational letter for further contact information. Your help is greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Pearl S. Chang, M.Ed., M.A.
University of Georgia
pearl1@uga.edu

Research Supervisor:
Brian Glaser, Ph.D.
bglaser@uga.edu

Adjunct Positions in Asian American Studies: Hunter College

The Asian American Studies Program at Hunter College (AASP), The City University of New York, currently seeks candidates to develop and teach Asian American Studies courses primarily in the Social Sciences, e.g. Psychology, Political Science, History, Sociology, Human Rights, Economics, etc. In addition, we also seek candidates to develop and teach Asian American Studies courses in Education, Journalism/Media Studies/Communication, and Public Health. Applicants must have at least an M.A. or ABD in a relevant field, as well as a record of successful undergraduate teaching.

About the Program
The Asian American Studies Program (AASP) at Hunter College was founded in 1993 on the initiative of students and faculty. Today, we are a small but dynamic program with a growing number of minors, and we offer approximately 12 courses per semester, ranging from our interdisciplinary survey courses to more advanced courses in Literature, Cultural Studies, and Diasporic community formations — West Asian American, Chinese American, and Korean American in particular. Located in the heart of New York City, the AASP works closely with Asian American organizations to build and sustain ties to local communities and concerns. Affiliated full-time faculty in the College are located in areas as diverse as Urban Studies, Film and Media, Sociology, English, and Dance.

Teaching at Hunter
Applicants should be prepared to teach their classe(es) to a cross-section of undergraduate students from all majors. The majority of our courses are taught by adjunct faculty: as a result the work you will do in our program is crucial to the process of introducing undergraduates to concepts concerning Asian American history and experience. We hope to work with dedicated, effective, and intelligent educators, and we seek to provide a welcoming and supportive work environment for our faculty.

Please email the following documents to: jennifer.hayashida@hunter.cuny.edu

  1. CV
  2. Letter of Intent
  3. Brief Pedagogical Statement outlining your teaching philosophy
  4. Contact information for at least 3 references

Jennifer Hayashida, Acting Director
Asian American Studies Program
Hunter College, CUNY
695 Park Avenue, Room 1037HE
New York, NY 10065

Call for Suggestions: Asian American Women Stories

Hello! I am the publisher of MySavvySisters.com a website dedicated to empowering women. I want all races to be represented on our website and I would love for you to pass along the names of any outstanding women that you know of who are enjoying their lives or careers. I would love to profile them and introduce them to our readers.

Please feel free to check out our site with tips on women I can profile.

Thanks!
Te-Erika Patterson


February 26, 2010

Written by C.N.

Links & Announcements #21

Here are some more announcements and links out that have come my way relating to Asians or Asian Americans. As always, links to other sites are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of their contents.

Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts: Special Issue Call

Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts invites submissions for the first issue of its fourth volume that will focus on “Intersections of Race and Gender.” Race/Ethnicity uses a classic piece as a point of departure for treatments of critical issues within the field of race and ethnic studies. While the classic piece establishes the thematic parameters of each issue, authors are under no obligation to actively engage the arguments posed by that work.

The issue will explore the multiple points where race and gender intersect across the globe, the range of consequences that meets those intersections, and the dynamics that occur at those intersections. Our focus on race and gender recognizes that there are numerous ways in which racialized and gendered identities intersect and that their intersection is often influenced by a variety of other cultural factors. We also welcome the viewpoints of practitioners working in the field. Deadline: February 28, 2010. Contact: Leslie Shortlidge at shortlidge.2@osu.edu; www.raceethnicity.org/coverart.html.

2010 Law & Social Inquiry Graduate Student Paper Competition

The editors of Law & Social Inquiry announce a competition for the best journal-length paper in the field of socio-legal studies written by a graduate or law student. Direct submissions as well as nominations of student work from faculty are invited.

The winning paper will be published in Law & Social Inquiry and the author(s) will receive a total cash prize of $500 (US). Law & Social Inquiry publishes both empirical and theoretical studies of socio-legal processes from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Deadline: March 1, 2010. Contact: (312) 988-6517; lsi-abf@abfn.org; www.blackwellpublishing.com/LSI.

American Institute of Indian Studies 2010 Fellowship

The American Institute of Indian Studies announces its 2010 fellowship competition and invites applications from scholars who wish to conduct their research in India. Junior fellowships are awarded to PhD candidates to conduct research for their dissertations in India for up to 11 months. Senior fellowships for scholars who hold the PhD degree are awarded for up to nine months of research in India. Deadline: July 1, 2010. Applications can be downloaded at www.indiastudies.org. Contact: (773) 702-8638; aiis@uchicago.edu.

Vietnamese American T-Shirts

My name is Ky Truong from San Jose, Ca. I recently started a line of Vietnamese inspired t-shirts called 3 Stripes Clothing. We are in the process of launching the line, but we decided to do something unique and let the people dictate what designs get printed by holding a poll on our Facebook fan page.

The reason why I started this line of t-shirts was because I felt that the Vietnamese community, especially those that are 2nd, 3rd or even 4th generation Vietnamese lack representation on the apparel market. When you look at the Filipino community, there are an abundance of shirts that represent their culture and pride. I would like to achieve that within the Vietnamese community.