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Behind the Headlines: APA News Blog

Academic Version: Applying my personal experiences and academic research as a professor of Sociology and Asian American Studies to provide a more complete understanding of political, economic, and cultural issues and current events related to American race relations, and Asia/Asian America in particular.

Plain English: Trying to put my Ph.D. to good use.

October 10, 2011

Written by C.N.

Links, Jobs, & Announcements #53

Here are some more announcements, links, and job postings about academic-related jobs, fellowships, and other opportunities for those interested in racial/ethnic/diversity issues. As always, the announcements and links are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the organization or college involved.

Graduate Student Conference on Immigration, CUNY

(New) Debates on Belonging:
A Graduate Student Conference on Contemporary Issues in Immigration

Keynote Speaker:
Dr. Richard Alba, Distinguished Professor of Sociology, CUNY Graduate Center

Friday, October 14, 2011
8:00am-6:00pm
Graduate Center – City University of New York
365 Fifth Avenue (at 34th Street), New York, NY

Hosted by the CUNY Graduate Center’s Immigration Working Group (IWG). Registration is FREE. Please register for the conference. All information, including agenda, panels, and abstracts, is available at http://www.gc-immigration.org/gcimmigrationconference. Lunch will be served.

Conference Overview:
With increasing frequency, questions of belonging have dominated the news and public debates on immigration: from the recent introduction of anti-immigrant legislation in many states to the spirited organizing around the DREAM Act and the controversy sparked by Park51’s proposal for a Muslim community center near Ground Zero. The prominence of such issues highlights both the fiercely contested nature of belonging in the United States, as well as how diverse groups – whether veteran or newly arrived, documented or undocumented, majority or minority, religious or secular – mobilize and advocate for their claims. While Congress debates and defers decisions on immigration reform on the national level, the question of belonging has distinctly regional and local manifestations. Immigrants and their children are claiming their place in American society, in its schools, workplaces and neighborhoods.

This interdisciplinary conference will bring together graduate students whose own research bear on these issues. (New) Debates on Belonging explores the many facets of immigrant belonging, incorporation and boundary drawing. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Place/region (communities, new destinations, urban areas)
  • Policy/activism/public health
  • Cross-national and historical comparisons
  • Culture and the arts
  • Citizenship
  • Dimensions of difference: gender, race, sexuality, religion, the body
  • Social institutions: labor and the economy, education, family, the media
  • Transnationalism
  • The second generation

Cosponsors:
CUNY Immigration Studies Initiative; CUNY Middle Eastern and Middle Eastern American Center; CUNY Sociology Dept.; CUNY Sociological Students’ Association; CUNY Center for Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies.

Position: Sociology & African Am Studies, Univ. of Virginia

The Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies and the Department of Sociology at the University of Virginia seek to fill a joint position in race and ethnicity. The position, open to applicants at the Assistant Professor (tenure-track) rank, is to begin August 25, 2012. Candidates with comparative, historical, or global approaches are particularly encouraged to apply.

Fields of specialization include but are not restricted to the following: race and the sociology of knowledge; race, immigration and labor; socioeconomic and racial/ethnic differences in health and mortality; urban ethnography, and urban inequality and poverty. The candidate’s tenure home will be the Department of Sociology, but teaching will be evenly split between the two units. Qualified applicants must hold a Ph.D. by the time of appointment.

To apply candidates must submit a Candidate Profile through Jobs@UVa (https://jobs.virginia.edu), search on posting number 0608419, and electronically attach the following: CV, cover letter, contact information for three references, statement of teaching philosophy and statement of research interest. Review of applications will begin by October 14, 2011, and applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Inquiries should be addressed to the Chair of the Search Committee: Milton Vickerman (mv8d@virginia.edu). Questions regarding the application process in Jobs@UVa should be directed to: Brenda Tekin (bt8x@virginia.edu).

Call for Papers: Midwest Sociological Society, Immigrants in the U.S.

Midwest Sociological Society Annual Meeting
Mar 29 – April 1, 2012
Minneapolis, MN

Negotiations in Resettlement: The Immigrant in the U.S.

This panel invites 250-word abstracts of papers that explore the myriad of ways that immigrants negotiate the social, cultural, economic and political realities and often difficulties inherent in the resettlement process. What moral and material resources do immigrant individuals, families and/or groups strategically employ as mechanisms to assist them in navigating some of the obstacles present in the process of incorporation into American society? We are interested in all facets of the immigrant experience, including, but not limited to the impact of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality on the choices immigrants make in terms of where they choose to resettle and how they shape what the resettlement process looks like.

Please submit your abstract by October 24, 2011 on the Midwestern Sociological Society’s website. If you have questions, contact either Tiffany Davis tdavis46@csu.edu or Erika Busse buss0101@umn.edu.

Position: U.S. History in the World, Oregon

The Department of History at Oregon State University invites applications for a tenure-track position in the history of the United States in the World, to begin Fall 2012. Assistant Professor preferred; Associate Professor possible. The successful candidate will have the Ph.D. in History and specialize in the United States in a global context, American international relations, and/or transnational history. Candidates should demonstrate a serious commitment to both scholarship and teaching. Teaching responsibilities include the U.S. history survey and upper-division and other appropriate courses in one or more areas of specialization.

To apply, submit letter of application and current C.V. via our application website at https://jobs.oregonstate.edu, and three letters of reference to:
Professor Marisa Chappell, Chair, US in the World Search Committee,
History Department, Oregon State University
306 Milam Hall
Corvallis, OR 97331

Full consideration will be given to candidates whose applications are complete by November 1, 2011.

Position: Director of Asian American Studies, Univ. of MD

The University of Maryland at College Park invites inquiries, nominations, and applications for the position of Director of the Asian American Studies Program (AAST). The ideal candidate should possess a strong record of scholarly research and publication; experience developing interdisciplinary curriculum and instructional programs in Asian-American Studies; the ability to manage budgetary and personnel matters; and skills for obtaining and managing extramural funding and development. Most importantly, we seek a dynamic individual who possesses an intellectual and programmatic vision as well as the interpersonal and consensus-building skills necessary for its realization.

The Director will administer and teach in the Asian American Studies program, an interdisciplinary undergraduate minor program that focuses on the histories, communities, and cultures of Asian Americans. Applicants should possess the ability to work with scholars and students in diverse areas in order to build intercampus collaboration, set a campus-wide agenda for innovative Asian American Studies education and research, and manage the financial and operational aspects of the program. Developing strong ties between the University of Maryland and the surrounding community will also be important.

Candidates must have an earned doctorate or other terminal degree, a substantial record of innovative scholarship, excellent teaching, and demonstrated qualities of academic leadership, with academic credentials commensurate with the appointment to the rank of associate or full professor. We are open to candidates from the humanities, history, and the social sciences. The position of Director is a full-time appointment in AAST; the Director will hold tenure in an appropriate department within the university. The Director reports to the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs and Dean for Undergraduate Studies. Salary is negotiable, commensurate with qualifications and experience.

For best consideration, applications should be submitted by Nov. 30, 2011, but the position will remain open until filled. Contact Julie Greene, Professor of History and Chair of the Search Committee, at jmg@umd.edu, with any questions about this search or to nominate individuals for the position. Apply online at jobs.umd.edu (position number 111974). Please include a cover letter, cv, and list of three references with contact information. Ask references to submit letters independently to jobs.umd.edu.

>Preview Performance: “Chinglish” by David Henry Hwang

The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) would like to invite you to a special benefit preview on Tuesday, Oct. 25, at 8pm, of David Henry Hwang’s new play on Broadway, Chinglish. David will join us for a Q&A after the performance, so you won’t want to miss this wonderful AALDEF event!

Chinglish is a romantic comedy about an American businessman who arrives in a bustling Chinese province looking to score a lucrative contact for his family’s sign-making firm. He soon finds that the complexities of such a venture far outstrip the expected differences in language, customs and manners–and calls into question even the most basic assumptions of human conduct.

David Henry Hwang, a Tony Award-winning playwright (M. Butterfly) and AALDEF’s 1989 Justice in Action award recipient, said, “Chinglish was born from the many visits I’ve made to China over the past five or six years to witness the exciting changes there. During one visit, I toured a new arts center where everything was first-rate–except for the ridiculously translated English signs. It was at that moment that I thought of writing this play.”

Chinglish, which had its world premiere at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre this past summer, got rave reviews. The Chicago Tribune called it a “shrewd, timely and razor-sharp comedy,” that is “surely Hwang’s best work since “M. Butterfly.”

Join us to catch a sneak peek of this new Broadway show before it opens on Oct. 27. We have a limited number of orchestra seats at a specially discounted price of $90 per ticket. Reserve your Chinglish tickets now by calling 212.966.5932 x212 or emailing events@aaldef.org. (Reservations are final only after payment has been received.)

Thanks so much for your continued support of AALDEF, and I look forward to seeing you at our Chinglish theater event on Oct. 25!

Position: President/CEO, Japanese American Museum

Located in the Little Tokyo business district within downtown Los Angeles, the Japanese American National Museum seeks to promote understanding and appreciation of America’s ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience. It is the largest museum in the United States dedicated to sharing that unique experience as an integral part of U.S. history and to preserving the rich heritage and cultural identity of Japanese Americans. In December 2010, the Museum was awarded the National Medal from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the nation’s highest honor for museums and libraries across the country.

Responsibilities:
Reporting to the Museum’s Board of Trustees, the President & CEO will bring critical leadership to the Museum with responsibility for the overall performance of the institution. The successful candidate will be a visionary and inspirational leader, with responsibility for enhancing both the external face of the institution and the internal operations that will allow the Museum to meet its educational and programmatic objectives in an increasingly challenging economic environment and to continue to grow and fulfill its mission.

The President & CEO participates as an ex-officio member of a national board, working with the Board in charting the course of the Museum’s response to changing audiences, donors, members, and other stakeholders throughout the United States (including Hawaii) and Japan. The Candidate will also interface with the Museum’s Board of Governors, chaired by Secretary Norman Y. Mineta (a current trustee) and formerly chaired by Senator Daniel K. Inouye; Governors serve as regional ambassadors for the Museum.

The President & CEO will supervise a staff of approximately 40 full-time equivalent employees. He/She is responsible for an approximately $7 million annual budget. A significant portion of the President & CEO’s responsibility will be leading and working closely with the Museum’s staff to maintain current and prospective relationships with donors, volunteers and stakeholders and establish new relationships with those constituencies.

Leadership, Management and Oversight

  • Lead the organization, setting the voice and tone from the top and providing vision for future growth and success
  • Serve as the key liaison between the Board of Trustees and the Museum’s staff and work with the chairs of the Board and its various committees in developing meeting agendas and materials
  • Manage and oversee all program planning, organizing, operating and staffing activities
  • Manage overall financial oversight and monitoring, including budget discipline
  • Foster and monitor the quality of the Museum’s activities to assure excellence as defined by the Board
  • Form strategic alliances and partnerships, when appropriate to achieve the Museum’s goals
  • Manage the development and review of appropriate metrics to measure the performance, impact and results of programs
  • Recommend long-range plans that support the Museum’s philosophy and strategic objectives

Financial Management, Fundraising and Community Affairs

  • Represent the Board and the Museum to the community
  • Oversee marketing and public relations programs
  • Assure the sound fiscal operation of the Museum, including timely, accurate and comprehensive preparation of an annual budget and its implementation
  • Develop and oversee a robust fundraising and development department (including joint development efforts with the Museum’s boards), and actively participate in those efforts
  • Work closely with the development team in sustaining and establishing relationships with foundations, government agencies, and private donors

Human Resources

  • Establish objectives through the selection, supervision, professional development, motivation and evaluation of personnel
  • Review personnel positions and organizational structure to ensure the efficient, timely and effective work of the organization with personnel appropriate for the position
  • Specify staff roles and responsibilities, evaluate performance regularly and hold staff accountable for results
  • Implement and maintain appropriate salary structures

Traits and Characteristics
The ideal candidate will be a charismatic, inspirational and energetic leader who takes initiative and has the ability to articulate the mission of the Museum to its various constituencies. The successful candidate will have a passion for the cultural and historical foundations of the Museum, specifically in helping communicate the lessons learned from the World War II incarceration of persons of Japanese descent. He/She will be an excellent communicator with strong interpersonal and relationship-building skills. The successful candidate will have the ability to develop and implement policies, procedures, and systems necessary to elevate the Museum’s programming, including the Museum’s National Center for the Preservation of Democracy and the Museum’s educational outreach initiatives in targeted regions, while overseeing the big picture and overall impact of the Museum on the community.

Although the successful candidate will most likely have solid leadership experience in the field of Museum management, it is also possible that the individual might come from another career background in the nonprofit, public or for-profit sectors. He/She will have a minimum of seven to ten years of management experience that demonstrates the ability to conceptualize, plan, implement, administer, evaluate, communicate, and develop resources with a strong emphasis on past results. Knowledge of the history of Japanese Americans would be helpful.

Education
An undergraduate degree is required; an advanced degree is preferred.

Compensation
Salary and benefits commensurate with qualifications and experience will be provided. Relocation assistance is negotiable.

To Apply
Please direct inquires, nominations, and applications, including resume and a compelling letter of interest in confidence to:

Karin Stellar
Morris & Berger
500 North Brand Boulevard, Suite 2150
Glendale, CA 91203
Telephone 818-507-1234 – Fax 818-507-4770
kstellar@morrisberger.com

Electronic submission is encouraged

The Museum is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Personnel are chosen on the basis of ability without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, marital status or sexual orientation, in accordance with federal and state law.

Vietnamese Translators Needed

My name is Aellon Krider and I am a Linguistic Recruiter with TransPerfect Translations. I am currently recruiting English into native Vietnamese translators located in the U.S. interested in long term freelance collaboration. We are looking for candidates experienced in health care or life sciences to join our network of certified linguists.

Applicants must:

  • Be a native speaker Vietnamese
  • Have a college degree and 5 years translation experience OR advanced degree and 3 years translation experience
  • Be able to produce documented proof of educational background
  • Be located in the U.S.

We are always looking to expand our qualified linguist resources, and would be interested in collaborating. If you are able to put me in contact with any other translators as well, I would greatly appreciate the referrals.

Thank you very much,
Aellon Krider
Linguistic Resources Coordinator
TransPerfect
t +1 212.689.5555 x1222 | skype: tpt_akride

Post-Doc: Race/Ethnicity, Duke

The Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in the Social Sciences (REGSS), an affiliate of the Social Science Research Institute at Duke University, is pleased to announce the establishment of the Samuel DuBois Cook Postdoctoral Fellowship. Cook, a political scientist, was the first black tenured professor at Duke University and served as a member of the Duke University Board of Trustees from 1981-1993 and is now a Trustee Emeritus.

REGSS seeks to provide a context where scholars interested in examining the constructs of race, ethnicity, and gender from an interdisciplinary perspective can engage each other in dialogue and collaboration. Our questions and our methodologies draw on disciplinary backgrounds that include economics, history, political science, psychology, public policy, and sociology. Scholars interested in the study of race, ethnicity, and the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity, are invited to apply for this one-year fellowship. Individuals working in the field of comparative race are also encouraged to apply. Postdoctoral fellows teach one course during the year, present their research at one of the center’s monthly research colloquia, and devote the rest of their time to research and writing.

Fields: Applications for study in any social science discipline are welcome. Please specify your home discipline and/or the discipline in which you received your Ph.D.

Stipend: $40,000 per fellowship period. Health benefits are available. Some funds are available for research expenses, including conference travel.
Fellowship Period: August 1, 2012 – May 15, 2013.

Eligibility: The primary criterion for selection is evidence of scholarship or scholarly interest in the study of race, ethnicity, or the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity. Applicants must complete all requirements for the doctoral degree by August 2012. Preference will be given to individuals who are within five years of their degree, but more senior applicants will be considered.

Application materials: Applicants must submit an application letter (including email address) in which the applicant clearly identifies the area or discipline of proposed research, curriculum vitae, sample publications and/or dissertation chapters, three letters of recommendation, a statement of research plans and a description of the course you prefer to teach. The research statement should be a separate document and not included in a cover letter. If recommendation letters accompany application materials they should be in a sealed envelope. Please indicate in application letter if you are legally authorized to work in the United States. Also, indicate whether you now, or in the future require sponsorship for employment visa status (e.g., Green Card, H-1B, TN, J-1.)

All materials should be sent to the address below and must be postmarked by January 16, 2012. Submitted material will not be returned to the applicant. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

REGSS Postdoctoral Fellowship Program
Duke University
Social Science Research Institute
Box 90420 / Erwin Mill
Durham, NC 27705
Telephone (919) 681-2702

http://regss.ssri.duke.edu

Question should be directed to:
Professor Paula D. McClain (pmcclain@duke.edu) or Professor Kerry L. Haynie (klhaynie@duke.edu)


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Copyright © 2001- by C.N. Le. Some rights reserved. Creative Commons License

Suggested reference: Le, C.N. . "Links, Jobs, & Announcements #53" Asian-Nation: The Landscape of Asian America. <http://www.asian-nation.org/headlines/2011/10/links-jobs-announcements-53/> ().

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